Commit 82681a31 authored by James Bottomley's avatar James Bottomley
Browse files

[SCSI] Merge branch 'linus'



Conflicts:
	drivers/message/fusion/mptsas.c

fixed up conflict between req->data_len accessors and mptsas driver updates.
Signed-off-by: default avatarJames Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
parents 3860c97b 8ebf9756
......@@ -60,3 +60,62 @@ Description:
Indicates whether the block layer should automatically
generate checksums for write requests bound for
devices that support receiving integrity metadata.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/alignment_offset
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report a physical block size that is
bigger than the logical block size (for instance a drive
with 4KB physical sectors exposing 512-byte logical
blocks to the operating system). This parameter
indicates how many bytes the beginning of the device is
offset from the disk's natural alignment.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/<partition>/alignment_offset
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report a physical block size that is
bigger than the logical block size (for instance a drive
with 4KB physical sectors exposing 512-byte logical
blocks to the operating system). This parameter
indicates how many bytes the beginning of the partition
is offset from the disk's natural alignment.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/logical_block_size
Date: May 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
This is the smallest unit the storage device can
address. It is typically 512 bytes.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/physical_block_size
Date: May 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
This is the smallest unit the storage device can write
without resorting to read-modify-write operation. It is
usually the same as the logical block size but may be
bigger. One example is SATA drives with 4KB sectors
that expose a 512-byte logical block size to the
operating system.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/minimum_io_size
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report a preferred minimum I/O size,
which is the smallest request the device can perform
without incurring a read-modify-write penalty. For disk
drives this is often the physical block size. For RAID
arrays it is often the stripe chunk size.
What: /sys/block/<disk>/queue/optimal_io_size
Date: April 2009
Contact: Martin K. Petersen <martin.petersen@oracle.com>
Description:
Storage devices may report an optimal I/O size, which is
the device's preferred unit of receiving I/O. This is
rarely reported for disk drives. For RAID devices it is
usually the stripe width or the internal block size.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/model
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 0 model for logical drive
Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/rev
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 0 revision for logical
drive Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/unique_id
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 83 serial number for logical
drive Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/vendor
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: Displays the SCSI INQUIRY page 0 vendor for logical drive
Y of controller X.
Where: /sys/bus/pci/devices/<dev>/ccissX/cXdY/block:cciss!cXdY
Date: March 2009
Kernel Version: 2.6.30
Contact: iss_storagedev@hp.com
Description: A symbolic link to /sys/block/cciss!cXdY
What: /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/cache/index*/cache_disable_X
Date: August 2008
KernelVersion: 2.6.27
Contact: mark.langsdorf@amd.com
Description: These files exist in every cpu's cache index directories.
There are currently 2 cache_disable_# files in each
directory. Reading from these files on a supported
processor will return that cache disable index value
for that processor and node. Writing to one of these
files will cause the specificed cache index to be disabled.
Currently, only AMD Family 10h Processors support cache index
disable, and only for their L3 caches. See the BIOS and
Kernel Developer's Guide at
http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/31116-Public-GH-BKDG_3.20_2-4-09.pdf
for formatting information and other details on the
cache index disable.
Users: joachim.deguara@amd.com
......@@ -704,12 +704,24 @@ this directory the following files can currently be found:
The current number of free dma_debug_entries
in the allocator.
dma-api/driver-filter
You can write a name of a driver into this file
to limit the debug output to requests from that
particular driver. Write an empty string to
that file to disable the filter and see
all errors again.
If you have this code compiled into your kernel it will be enabled by default.
If you want to boot without the bookkeeping anyway you can provide
'dma_debug=off' as a boot parameter. This will disable DMA-API debugging.
Notice that you can not enable it again at runtime. You have to reboot to do
so.
If you want to see debug messages only for a special device driver you can
specify the dma_debug_driver=<drivername> parameter. This will enable the
driver filter at boot time. The debug code will only print errors for that
driver afterwards. This filter can be disabled or changed later using debugfs.
When the code disables itself at runtime this is most likely because it ran
out of dma_debug_entries. These entries are preallocated at boot. The number
of preallocated entries is defined per architecture. If it is too low for you
......
......@@ -13,7 +13,8 @@ DOCBOOKS := z8530book.xml mcabook.xml device-drivers.xml \
gadget.xml libata.xml mtdnand.xml librs.xml rapidio.xml \
genericirq.xml s390-drivers.xml uio-howto.xml scsi.xml \
mac80211.xml debugobjects.xml sh.xml regulator.xml \
alsa-driver-api.xml writing-an-alsa-driver.xml
alsa-driver-api.xml writing-an-alsa-driver.xml \
tracepoint.xml
###
# The build process is as follows (targets):
......
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.1.2//EN"
"http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.1.2/docbookx.dtd" []>
<book id="Tracepoints">
<bookinfo>
<title>The Linux Kernel Tracepoint API</title>
<authorgroup>
<author>
<firstname>Jason</firstname>
<surname>Baron</surname>
<affiliation>
<address>
<email>jbaron@redhat.com</email>
</address>
</affiliation>
</author>
</authorgroup>
<legalnotice>
<para>
This documentation is free software; you can redistribute
it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public
License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later
version.
</para>
<para>
This program is distributed in the hope that it will be
useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied
warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
See the GNU General Public License for more details.
</para>
<para>
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
License along with this program; if not, write to the Free
Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston,
MA 02111-1307 USA
</para>
<para>
For more details see the file COPYING in the source
distribution of Linux.
</para>
</legalnotice>
</bookinfo>
<toc></toc>
<chapter id="intro">
<title>Introduction</title>
<para>
Tracepoints are static probe points that are located in strategic points
throughout the kernel. 'Probes' register/unregister with tracepoints
via a callback mechanism. The 'probes' are strictly typed functions that
are passed a unique set of parameters defined by each tracepoint.
</para>
<para>
From this simple callback mechanism, 'probes' can be used to profile, debug,
and understand kernel behavior. There are a number of tools that provide a
framework for using 'probes'. These tools include Systemtap, ftrace, and
LTTng.
</para>
<para>
Tracepoints are defined in a number of header files via various macros. Thus,
the purpose of this document is to provide a clear accounting of the available
tracepoints. The intention is to understand not only what tracepoints are
available but also to understand where future tracepoints might be added.
</para>
<para>
The API presented has functions of the form:
<function>trace_tracepointname(function parameters)</function>. These are the
tracepoints callbacks that are found throughout the code. Registering and
unregistering probes with these callback sites is covered in the
<filename>Documentation/trace/*</filename> directory.
</para>
</chapter>
<chapter id="irq">
<title>IRQ</title>
!Iinclude/trace/events/irq.h
</chapter>
</book>
......@@ -192,23 +192,24 @@ rcu/rcuhier (which displays the struct rcu_node hierarchy).
The output of "cat rcu/rcudata" looks as follows:
rcu:
0 c=4011 g=4012 pq=1 pqc=4011 qp=0 rpfq=1 rp=3c2a dt=23301/73 dn=2 df=1882 of=0 ri=2126 ql=2 b=10
1 c=4011 g=4012 pq=1 pqc=4011 qp=0 rpfq=3 rp=39a6 dt=78073/1 dn=2 df=1402 of=0 ri=1875 ql=46 b=10
2 c=4010 g=4010 pq=1 pqc=4010 qp=0 rpfq=-5 rp=1d12 dt=16646/0 dn=2 df=3140 of=0 ri=2080 ql=0 b=10
3 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=2b50 dt=21159/1 dn=2 df=2230 of=0 ri=1923 ql=72 b=10
4 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1644 dt=5783/1 dn=2 df=3348 of=0 ri=2805 ql=7 b=10
5 c=4012 g=4013 pq=0 pqc=4011 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1aac dt=5879/1 dn=2 df=3140 of=0 ri=2066 ql=10 b=10
6 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=ed8 dt=5847/1 dn=2 df=3797 of=0 ri=1266 ql=10 b=10
7 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1fa2 dt=6199/1 dn=2 df=2795 of=0 ri=2162 ql=28 b=10
rcu:
0 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=10951/1 dn=0 df=1101 of=0 ri=36 ql=0 b=10
1 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=16117/1 dn=0 df=1015 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
2 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=1445/1 dn=0 df=1839 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
3 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=6681/1 dn=0 df=1545 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
4 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=1003/1 dn=0 df=1992 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
5 c=17829 g=17830 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=1 dt=3887/1 dn=0 df=3331 of=0 ri=4 ql=2 b=10
6 c=17829 g=17829 pq=1 pqc=17829 qp=0 dt=859/1 dn=0 df=3224 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
7 c=17829 g=17830 pq=0 pqc=17829 qp=1 dt=3761/1 dn=0 df=1818 of=0 ri=0 ql=2 b=10
rcu_bh:
0 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=0 rpfq=-145 rp=21d6 dt=23301/73 dn=2 df=0 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
1 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-170 rp=20ce dt=78073/1 dn=2 df=26 of=0 ri=5 ql=0 b=10
2 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-83 rp=fbd dt=16646/0 dn=2 df=28 of=0 ri=4 ql=0 b=10
3 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=0 rpfq=-105 rp=178c dt=21159/1 dn=2 df=28 of=0 ri=2 ql=0 b=10
4 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-30 rp=b54 dt=5783/1 dn=2 df=32 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
5 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-29 rp=df5 dt=5879/1 dn=2 df=30 of=0 ri=3 ql=0 b=10
6 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-28 rp=788 dt=5847/1 dn=2 df=32 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
7 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-53 rp=1098 dt=6199/1 dn=2 df=30 of=0 ri=3 ql=0 b=10
0 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=10951/1 dn=0 df=0 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
1 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=16117/1 dn=0 df=13 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
2 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=1445/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
3 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=6681/1 dn=0 df=9 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
4 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=1003/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
5 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=3887/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
6 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=859/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
7 c=-275 g=-275 pq=1 pqc=-275 qp=0 dt=3761/1 dn=0 df=15 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
The first section lists the rcu_data structures for rcu, the second for
rcu_bh. Each section has one line per CPU, or eight for this 8-CPU system.
......@@ -253,12 +254,6 @@ o "pqc" indicates which grace period the last-observed quiescent
o "qp" indicates that RCU still expects a quiescent state from
this CPU.
o "rpfq" is the number of rcu_pending() calls on this CPU required
to induce this CPU to invoke force_quiescent_state().
o "rp" is low-order four hex digits of the count of how many times
rcu_pending() has been invoked on this CPU.
o "dt" is the current value of the dyntick counter that is incremented
when entering or leaving dynticks idle state, either by the
scheduler or by irq. The number after the "/" is the interrupt
......@@ -305,6 +300,9 @@ o "b" is the batch limit for this CPU. If more than this number
of RCU callbacks is ready to invoke, then the remainder will
be deferred.
There is also an rcu/rcudata.csv file with the same information in
comma-separated-variable spreadsheet format.
The output of "cat rcu/rcugp" looks as follows:
......@@ -411,3 +409,63 @@ o Each element of the form "1/1 0:127 ^0" represents one struct
For example, the first entry at the lowest level shows
"^0", indicating that it corresponds to bit zero in
the first entry at the middle level.
The output of "cat rcu/rcu_pending" looks as follows:
rcu:
0 np=255892 qsp=53936 cbr=0 cng=14417 gpc=10033 gps=24320 nf=6445 nn=146741
1 np=261224 qsp=54638 cbr=0 cng=25723 gpc=16310 gps=2849 nf=5912 nn=155792
2 np=237496 qsp=49664 cbr=0 cng=2762 gpc=45478 gps=1762 nf=1201 nn=136629
3 np=236249 qsp=48766 cbr=0 cng=286 gpc=48049 gps=1218 nf=207 nn=137723
4 np=221310 qsp=46850 cbr=0 cng=26 gpc=43161 gps=4634 nf=3529 nn=123110
5 np=237332 qsp=48449 cbr=0 cng=54 gpc=47920 gps=3252 nf=201 nn=137456
6 np=219995 qsp=46718 cbr=0 cng=50 gpc=42098 gps=6093 nf=4202 nn=120834
7 np=249893 qsp=49390 cbr=0 cng=72 gpc=38400 gps=17102 nf=41 nn=144888
rcu_bh:
0 np=146741 qsp=1419 cbr=0 cng=6 gpc=0 gps=0 nf=2 nn=145314
1 np=155792 qsp=12597 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=8 nf=3 nn=143180
2 np=136629 qsp=18680 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=7 gps=6 nf=0 nn=117936
3 np=137723 qsp=2843 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=10 gps=7 nf=0 nn=134863
4 np=123110 qsp=12433 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=2 nf=0 nn=110671
5 np=137456 qsp=4210 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=5 nf=0 nn=133235
6 np=120834 qsp=9902 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=3 nf=2 nn=110921
7 np=144888 qsp=26336 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=8 gps=2 nf=0 nn=118542
As always, this is once again split into "rcu" and "rcu_bh" portions.
The fields are as follows:
o "np" is the number of times that __rcu_pending() has been invoked
for the corresponding flavor of RCU.
o "qsp" is the number of times that the RCU was waiting for a
quiescent state from this CPU.
o "cbr" is the number of times that this CPU had RCU callbacks
that had passed through a grace period, and were thus ready
to be invoked.
o "cng" is the number of times that this CPU needed another
grace period while RCU was idle.
o "gpc" is the number of times that an old grace period had
completed, but this CPU was not yet aware of it.
o "gps" is the number of times that a new grace period had started,
but this CPU was not yet aware of it.
o "nf" is the number of times that this CPU suspected that the
current grace period had run for too long, and thus needed to
be forced.
Please note that "forcing" consists of sending resched IPIs
to holdout CPUs. If that CPU really still is in an old RCU
read-side critical section, then we really do have to wait for it.
The assumption behing "forcing" is that the CPU is not still in
an old RCU read-side critical section, but has not yet responded
for some other reason.
o "nn" is the number of times that this CPU needed nothing. Alert
readers will note that the rcu "nn" number for a given CPU very
closely matches the rcu_bh "np" number for that same CPU. This
is due to short-circuit evaluation in rcu_pending().
......@@ -184,8 +184,9 @@ length. Single character labels using special characters, that being anything
other than a letter or digit, are reserved for use by the Smack development
team. Smack labels are unstructured, case sensitive, and the only operation
ever performed on them is comparison for equality. Smack labels cannot
contain unprintable characters or the "/" (slash) character. Smack labels
cannot begin with a '-', which is reserved for special options.
contain unprintable characters, the "/" (slash), the "\" (backslash), the "'"
(quote) and '"' (double-quote) characters.
Smack labels cannot begin with a '-', which is reserved for special options.
There are some predefined labels:
......@@ -523,3 +524,18 @@ Smack supports some mount options:
These mount options apply to all file system types.
Smack auditing
If you want Smack auditing of security events, you need to set CONFIG_AUDIT
in your kernel configuration.
By default, all denied events will be audited. You can change this behavior by
writing a single character to the /smack/logging file :
0 : no logging
1 : log denied (default)
2 : log accepted
3 : log denied & accepted
Events are logged as 'key=value' pairs, for each event you at least will get
the subjet, the object, the rights requested, the action, the kernel function
that triggered the event, plus other pairs depending on the type of event
audited.
......@@ -186,7 +186,7 @@ a virtual address mapping (unlike the earlier scheme of virtual address
do not have a corresponding kernel virtual address space mapping) and
low-memory pages.
Note: Please refer to Documentation/PCI/PCI-DMA-mapping.txt for a discussion
Note: Please refer to Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt for a discussion
on PCI high mem DMA aspects and mapping of scatter gather lists, and support
for 64 bit PCI.
......
......@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ go_lock | Called for the first local holder of a lock
go_unlock | Called on the final local unlock of a lock
go_dump | Called to print content of object for debugfs file, or on
| error to dump glock to the log.
go_type; | The type of the glock, LM_TYPE_.....
go_type | The type of the glock, LM_TYPE_.....
go_min_hold_time | The minimum hold time
The minimum hold time for each lock is the time after a remote lock
......
......@@ -11,18 +11,15 @@ their I/O so file system consistency is maintained. One of the nifty
features of GFS is perfect consistency -- changes made to the file system
on one machine show up immediately on all other machines in the cluster.
GFS uses interchangable inter-node locking mechanisms. Different lock
modules can plug into GFS and each file system selects the appropriate
lock module at mount time. Lock modules include:
GFS uses interchangable inter-node locking mechanisms, the currently
supported mechanisms are:
lock_nolock -- allows gfs to be used as a local file system
lock_dlm -- uses a distributed lock manager (dlm) for inter-node locking
The dlm is found at linux/fs/dlm/
In addition to interfacing with an external locking manager, a gfs lock
module is responsible for interacting with external cluster management
systems. Lock_dlm depends on user space cluster management systems found
Lock_dlm depends on user space cluster management systems found
at the URL above.
To use gfs as a local file system, no external clustering systems are
......@@ -31,13 +28,19 @@ needed, simply:
$ mkfs -t gfs2 -p lock_nolock -j 1 /dev/block_device
$ mount -t gfs2 /dev/block_device /dir
GFS2 is not on-disk compatible with previous versions of GFS.
If you are using Fedora, you need to install the gfs2-utils package
and, for lock_dlm, you will also need to install the cman package
and write a cluster.conf as per the documentation.
GFS2 is not on-disk compatible with previous versions of GFS, but it
is pretty close.
The following man pages can be found at the URL above:
gfs2_fsck to repair a filesystem
fsck.gfs2 to repair a filesystem
gfs2_grow to expand a filesystem online
gfs2_jadd to add journals to a filesystem online
gfs2_tool to manipulate, examine and tune a filesystem
gfs2_quota to examine and change quota values in a filesystem
gfs2_convert to convert a gfs filesystem to gfs2 in-place
mount.gfs2 to help mount(8) mount a filesystem
mkfs.gfs2 to make a filesystem
......@@ -133,4 +133,4 @@ RAM/SWAP in 10240 inodes and it is only accessible by root.
Author:
Christoph Rohland <cr@sap.com>, 1.12.01
Updated:
Hugh Dickins <hugh@veritas.com>, 4 June 2007
Hugh Dickins, 4 June 2007
Futex Requeue PI
----------------
Requeueing of tasks from a non-PI futex to a PI futex requires
special handling in order to ensure the underlying rt_mutex is never
left without an owner if it has waiters; doing so would break the PI
boosting logic [see rt-mutex-desgin.txt] For the purposes of
brevity, this action will be referred to as "requeue_pi" throughout
this document. Priority inheritance is abbreviated throughout as
"PI".
Motivation
----------
Without requeue_pi, the glibc implementation of
pthread_cond_broadcast() must resort to waking all the tasks waiting
on a pthread_condvar and letting them try to sort out which task
gets to run first in classic thundering-herd formation. An ideal
implementation would wake the highest-priority waiter, and leave the
rest to the natural wakeup inherent in unlocking the mutex
associated with the condvar.
Consider the simplified glibc calls:
/* caller must lock mutex */
pthread_cond_wait(cond, mutex)
{
lock(cond->__data.__lock);
unlock(mutex);
do {
unlock(cond->__data.__lock);
futex_wait(cond->__data.__futex);
lock(cond->__data.__lock);
} while(...)
unlock(cond->__data.__lock);
lock(mutex);
}
pthread_cond_broadcast(cond)
{
lock(cond->__data.__lock);
unlock(cond->__data.__lock);
futex_requeue(cond->data.__futex, cond->mutex);
}
Once pthread_cond_broadcast() requeues the tasks, the cond->mutex
has waiters. Note that pthread_cond_wait() attempts to lock the
mutex only after it has returned to user space. This will leave the
underlying rt_mutex with waiters, and no owner, breaking the
previously mentioned PI-boosting algorithms.
In order to support PI-aware pthread_condvar's, the kernel needs to
be able to requeue tasks to PI futexes. This support implies that
upon a successful futex_wait system call, the caller would return to
user space already holding the PI futex. The glibc implementation
would be modified as follows:
/* caller must lock mutex */
pthread_cond_wait_pi(cond, mutex)
{
lock(cond->__data.__lock);
unlock(mutex);
do {
unlock(cond->__data.__lock);
futex_wait_requeue_pi(cond->__data.__futex);
lock(cond->__data.__lock);
} while(...)
unlock(cond->__data.__lock);
/* the kernel acquired the the mutex for us */
}
pthread_cond_broadcast_pi(cond)
{
lock(cond->__data.__lock);
unlock(cond->__data.__lock);
futex_requeue_pi(cond->data.__futex, cond->mutex);
}
The actual glibc implementation will likely test for PI and make the
necessary changes inside the existing calls rather than creating new
calls for the PI cases. Similar changes are needed for
pthread_cond_timedwait() and pthread_cond_signal().
Implementation
--------------
In order to ensure the rt_mutex has an owner if it has waiters, it
is necessary for both the requeue code, as well as the waiting code,
to be able to acquire the rt_mutex before returning to user space.
The requeue code cannot simply wake the waiter and leave it to
acquire the rt_mutex as it would open a race window between the
requeue call returning to user space and the waiter waking and
starting to run. This is especially true in the uncontended case.
The solution involves two new rt_mutex helper routines,
rt_mutex_start_proxy_lock() and rt_mutex_finish_proxy_lock(), which
allow the requeue code to acquire an uncontended rt_mutex on behalf
of the waiter and to enqueue the waiter on a contended rt_mutex.
Two new system calls provide the kernel<->user interface to
requeue_pi: FUTEX_WAIT_REQUEUE_PI and FUTEX_REQUEUE_CMP_PI.
FUTEX_WAIT_REQUEUE_PI is called by the waiter (pthread_cond_wait()
and pthread_cond_timedwait()) to block on the initial futex and wait
to be requeued to a PI-aware futex. The implementation is the
result of a high-speed collision between futex_wait() and
futex_lock_pi(), with some extra logic to check for the additional
wake-up scenarios.
FUTEX_REQUEUE_CMP_PI is called by the waker
(pthread_cond_broadcast() and pthread_cond_signal()) to requeue and
possibly wake the waiting tasks. Internally, this system call is
still handled by futex_requeue (by passing requeue_pi=1). Before
requeueing, futex_requeue() attempts to acquire the requeue target
PI futex on behalf of the top waiter. If it can, this waiter is
woken. futex_requeue() then proceeds to requeue the remaining
nr_wake+nr_requeue tasks to the PI futex, calling
rt_mutex_start_proxy_lock() prior to each requeue to prepare the
task as a waiter on the underlying rt_mutex. It is possible that
the lock can be acquired at this stage as well, if so, the next
waiter is woken to finish the acquisition of the lock.
FUTEX_REQUEUE_PI accepts nr_wake and nr_requeue as arguments, but
their sum is all that really matters. futex_requeue() will wake or
requeue up to nr_wake + nr_requeue tasks. It will wake only as many
tasks as it can acquire the lock for, which in the majority of cases
should be 0 as good programming practice dictates that the caller of
either pthread_cond_broadcast() or pthread_cond_signal() acquire the
mutex prior to making the call. FUTEX_REQUEUE_PI requires that
nr_wake=1. nr_requeue should be INT_MAX for broadcast and 0 for
signal.
......@@ -150,6 +150,11 @@ fan[1-*]_min Fan minimum value
Unit: revolution/min (RPM)
RW
fan[1-*]_max Fan maximum value
Unit: revolution/min (RPM)
Only rarely supported by the hardware.
RW
fan[1-*]_input Fan input value.
Unit: revolution/min (RPM)
RO
......@@ -390,6 +395,7 @@ OR
in[0-*]_min_alarm
in[0-*]_max_alarm
fan[1-*]_min_alarm
fan[1-*]_max_alarm
temp[1-*]_min_alarm
temp[1-*]_max_alarm
temp[1-*]_crit_alarm
......
......@@ -18,8 +18,12 @@ Usage
Anonymous finger details are sent sequentially as separate packets of ABS
events. Only the ABS_MT events are recognized as part of a finger
packet. The end of a packet is marked by calling the input_mt_sync()
function, which generates a SYN_MT_REPORT event. The end of multi-touch
transfer is marked by calling the usual input_sync() function.