Commit 4dd9ec49 authored by Linus Torvalds's avatar Linus Torvalds
Browse files

Merge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/net-next-2.6

* git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/net-next-2.6: (1075 commits)
  myri10ge: update driver version number to 1.4.3-1.369
  r8169: add shutdown handler
  r8169: preliminary 8168d support
  r8169: support additional 8168cp chipset
  r8169: change default behavior for mildly identified 8168c chipsets
  r8169: add a new 8168cp flavor
  r8169: add a new 8168c flavor (bis)
  r8169: add a new 8168c flavor
  r8169: sync existing 8168 device hardware start sequences with vendor driver
  r8169: 8168b Tx performance tweak
  r8169: make room for more specific 8168 hardware start procedure
  r8169: shuffle some registers handling around (8168 operation only)
  r8169: new phy init parameters for the 8168b
  r8169: update phy init parameters
  r8169: wake up the PHY of the 8168
  af_key: fix SADB_X_SPDDELETE response
  ath9k: Fix return code when ath9k_hw_setpower() fails on reset
  ath9k: remove nasty FAIL macro from ath9k_hw_reset()
  gre: minor cleanups in netlink interface
  gre: fix copy and paste error
  ...
parents 86ed5a93 6861ff35
......@@ -145,7 +145,6 @@ usage should require reading the full document.
this though and the recommendation to allow only a single
interface in STA mode at first!
</para>
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_if_types
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_if_init_conf
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_if_conf
</chapter>
......@@ -177,8 +176,7 @@ usage should require reading the full document.
<title>functions/definitions</title>
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_rx_status
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h mac80211_rx_flags
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_control
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_status_flags
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_info
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_rx
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_rx_irqsafe
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_status
......@@ -189,12 +187,11 @@ usage should require reading the full document.
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_ctstoself_duration
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_generic_frame_duration
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_get_hdrlen_from_skb
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_get_hdrlen
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_hdrlen
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_wake_queue
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_stop_queue
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_start_queues
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_stop_queues
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_wake_queues
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_stop_queues
</sect1>
</chapter>
......@@ -230,8 +227,7 @@ usage should require reading the full document.
<title>Multiple queues and QoS support</title>
<para>TBD</para>
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_queue_params
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_queue_stats_data
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_queue
!Finclude/net/mac80211.h ieee80211_tx_queue_stats
</chapter>
<chapter id="AP">
......
......@@ -6,6 +6,24 @@ be removed from this file.
---------------------------
What: old static regulatory information and ieee80211_regdom module parameter
When: 2.6.29
Why: The old regulatory infrastructure has been replaced with a new one
which does not require statically defined regulatory domains. We do
not want to keep static regulatory domains in the kernel due to the
the dynamic nature of regulatory law and localization. We kept around
the old static definitions for the regulatory domains of:
* US
* JP
* EU
and used by default the US when CONFIG_WIRELESS_OLD_REGULATORY was
set. We also kept around the ieee80211_regdom module parameter in case
some applications were relying on it. Changing regulatory domains
can now be done instead by using nl80211, as is done with iw.
Who: Luis R. Rodriguez <lrodriguez@atheros.com>
---------------------------
What: dev->power.power_state
When: July 2007
Why: Broken design for runtime control over driver power states, confusing
......@@ -232,6 +250,9 @@ What (Why):
- xt_mark match revision 0
(superseded by xt_mark match revision 1)
- xt_recent: the old ipt_recent proc dir
(superseded by /proc/net/xt_recent)
When: January 2009 or Linux 2.7.0, whichever comes first
Why: Superseded by newer revisions or modules
Who: Jan Engelhardt <jengelh@computergmbh.de>
......
Copyright (c) 2003-2008 QLogic Corporation
QLogic Linux Networking HBA Driver
This program includes a device driver for Linux 2.6 that may be
distributed with QLogic hardware specific firmware binary file.
You may modify and redistribute the device driver code under the
GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software
Foundation (version 2 or a later version).
You may redistribute the hardware specific firmware binary file
under the following terms:
1. Redistribution of source code (only if applicable),
must retain the above copyright notice, this list of
conditions and the following disclaimer.
2. Redistribution in binary form must reproduce the above
copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other
materials provided with the distribution.
3. The name of QLogic Corporation may not be used to
endorse or promote products derived from this software
without specific prior written permission
REGARDLESS OF WHAT LICENSING MECHANISM IS USED OR APPLICABLE,
THIS PROGRAM IS PROVIDED BY QLOGIC CORPORATION "AS IS'' AND ANY
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR
BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL,
EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED
TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON
ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY,
OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
USER ACKNOWLEDGES AND AGREES THAT USE OF THIS PROGRAM WILL NOT
CREATE OR GIVE GROUNDS FOR A LICENSE BY IMPLICATION, ESTOPPEL, OR
OTHERWISE IN ANY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS (PATENT, COPYRIGHT,
TRADE SECRET, MASK WORK, OR OTHER PROPRIETARY RIGHT) EMBODIED IN
ANY OTHER QLOGIC HARDWARE OR SOFTWARE EITHER SOLELY OR IN
COMBINATION WITH THIS PROGRAM.
......@@ -35,8 +35,9 @@ This file contains
6.1 general settings
6.2 local loopback of sent frames
6.3 CAN controller hardware filters
6.4 currently supported CAN hardware
6.5 todo
6.4 The virtual CAN driver (vcan)
6.5 currently supported CAN hardware
6.6 todo
7 Credits
......@@ -584,7 +585,42 @@ solution for a couple of reasons:
@133MHz with four SJA1000 CAN controllers from 2002 under heavy bus
load without any problems ...
6.4 currently supported CAN hardware (September 2007)
6.4 The virtual CAN driver (vcan)
Similar to the network loopback devices, vcan offers a virtual local
CAN interface. A full qualified address on CAN consists of
- a unique CAN Identifier (CAN ID)
- the CAN bus this CAN ID is transmitted on (e.g. can0)
so in common use cases more than one virtual CAN interface is needed.
The virtual CAN interfaces allow the transmission and reception of CAN
frames without real CAN controller hardware. Virtual CAN network
devices are usually named 'vcanX', like vcan0 vcan1 vcan2 ...
When compiled as a module the virtual CAN driver module is called vcan.ko
Since Linux Kernel version 2.6.24 the vcan driver supports the Kernel
netlink interface to create vcan network devices. The creation and
removal of vcan network devices can be managed with the ip(8) tool:
- Create a virtual CAN network interface:
ip link add type vcan
- Create a virtual CAN network interface with a specific name 'vcan42':
ip link add dev vcan42 type vcan
- Remove a (virtual CAN) network interface 'vcan42':
ip link del vcan42
The tool 'vcan' from the SocketCAN SVN repository on BerliOS is obsolete.
Virtual CAN network device creation in older Kernels:
In Linux Kernel versions < 2.6.24 the vcan driver creates 4 vcan
netdevices at module load time by default. This value can be changed
with the module parameter 'numdev'. E.g. 'modprobe vcan numdev=8'
6.5 currently supported CAN hardware
On the project website http://developer.berlios.de/projects/socketcan
there are different drivers available:
......@@ -603,7 +639,7 @@ solution for a couple of reasons:
Please check the Mailing Lists on the berlios OSS project website.
6.5 todo (September 2007)
6.6 todo
The configuration interface for CAN network drivers is still an open
issue that has not been finalized in the socketcan project. Also the
......
......@@ -24,4 +24,56 @@ netif_{start|stop|wake}_subqueue() functions to manage each queue while the
device is still operational. netdev->queue_lock is still used when the device
comes online or when it's completely shut down (unregister_netdev(), etc.).
Author: Peter P. Waskiewicz Jr. <peter.p.waskiewicz.jr@intel.com>
Section 2: Qdisc support for multiqueue devices
-----------------------------------------------
Currently two qdiscs are optimized for multiqueue devices. The first is the
default pfifo_fast qdisc. This qdisc supports one qdisc per hardware queue.
A new round-robin qdisc, sch_multiq also supports multiple hardware queues. The
qdisc is responsible for classifying the skb's and then directing the skb's to
bands and queues based on the value in skb->queue_mapping. Use this field in
the base driver to determine which queue to send the skb to.
sch_multiq has been added for hardware that wishes to avoid head-of-line
blocking. It will cycle though the bands and verify that the hardware queue
associated with the band is not stopped prior to dequeuing a packet.
On qdisc load, the number of bands is based on the number of queues on the
hardware. Once the association is made, any skb with skb->queue_mapping set,
will be queued to the band associated with the hardware queue.
Section 3: Brief howto using MULTIQ for multiqueue devices
---------------------------------------------------------------
The userspace command 'tc,' part of the iproute2 package, is used to configure
qdiscs. To add the MULTIQ qdisc to your network device, assuming the device
is called eth0, run the following command:
# tc qdisc add dev eth0 root handle 1: multiq
The qdisc will allocate the number of bands to equal the number of queues that
the device reports, and bring the qdisc online. Assuming eth0 has 4 Tx
queues, the band mapping would look like:
band 0 => queue 0
band 1 => queue 1
band 2 => queue 2
band 3 => queue 3
Traffic will begin flowing through each queue based on either the simple_tx_hash
function or based on netdev->select_queue() if you have it defined.
The behavior of tc filters remains the same. However a new tc action,
skbedit, has been added. Assuming you wanted to route all traffic to a
specific host, for example 192.168.0.3, through a specific queue you could use
this action and establish a filter such as:
tc filter add dev eth0 parent 1: protocol ip prio 1 u32 \
match ip dst 192.168.0.3 \
action skbedit queue_mapping 3
Author: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@intel.com>
Original Author: Peter P. Waskiewicz Jr. <peter.p.waskiewicz.jr@intel.com>
Linux Phonet protocol family
============================
Introduction
------------
Phonet is a packet protocol used by Nokia cellular modems for both IPC
and RPC. With the Linux Phonet socket family, Linux host processes can
receive and send messages from/to the modem, or any other external
device attached to the modem. The modem takes care of routing.
Phonet packets can be exchanged through various hardware connections
depending on the device, such as:
- USB with the CDC Phonet interface,
- infrared,
- Bluetooth,
- an RS232 serial port (with a dedicated "FBUS" line discipline),
- the SSI bus with some TI OMAP processors.
Packets format
--------------
Phonet packets have a common header as follows:
struct phonethdr {
uint8_t pn_media; /* Media type (link-layer identifier) */
uint8_t pn_rdev; /* Receiver device ID */
uint8_t pn_sdev; /* Sender device ID */
uint8_t pn_res; /* Resource ID or function */
uint16_t pn_length; /* Big-endian message byte length (minus 6) */
uint8_t pn_robj; /* Receiver object ID */
uint8_t pn_sobj; /* Sender object ID */
};
On Linux, the link-layer header includes the pn_media byte (see below).
The next 7 bytes are part of the network-layer header.
The device ID is split: the 6 higher-order bits consitute the device
address, while the 2 lower-order bits are used for multiplexing, as are
the 8-bit object identifiers. As such, Phonet can be considered as a
network layer with 6 bits of address space and 10 bits for transport
protocol (much like port numbers in IP world).
The modem always has address number zero. All other device have a their
own 6-bit address.
Link layer
----------
Phonet links are always point-to-point links. The link layer header
consists of a single Phonet media type byte. It uniquely identifies the
link through which the packet is transmitted, from the modem's
perspective. Each Phonet network device shall prepend and set the media
type byte as appropriate. For convenience, a common phonet_header_ops
link-layer header operations structure is provided. It sets the
media type according to the network device hardware address.
Linux Phonet network interfaces support a dedicated link layer packets
type (ETH_P_PHONET) which is out of the Ethernet type range. They can
only send and receive Phonet packets.
The virtual TUN tunnel device driver can also be used for Phonet. This
requires IFF_TUN mode, _without_ the IFF_NO_PI flag. In this case,
there is no link-layer header, so there is no Phonet media type byte.
Note that Phonet interfaces are not allowed to re-order packets, so
only the (default) Linux FIFO qdisc should be used with them.
Network layer
-------------
The Phonet socket address family maps the Phonet packet header:
struct sockaddr_pn {
sa_family_t spn_family; /* AF_PHONET */
uint8_t spn_obj; /* Object ID */
uint8_t spn_dev; /* Device ID */
uint8_t spn_resource; /* Resource or function */
uint8_t spn_zero[...]; /* Padding */
};
The resource field is only used when sending and receiving;
It is ignored by bind() and getsockname().
Low-level datagram protocol
---------------------------
Applications can send Phonet messages using the Phonet datagram socket
protocol from the PF_PHONET family. Each socket is bound to one of the
2^10 object IDs available, and can send and receive packets with any
other peer.
struct sockaddr_pn addr = { .spn_family = AF_PHONET, };
ssize_t len;
socklen_t addrlen = sizeof(addr);
int fd;
fd = socket(PF_PHONET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
bind(fd, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, sizeof(addr));
/* ... */
sendto(fd, msg, msglen, 0, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, sizeof(addr));
len = recvfrom(fd, buf, sizeof(buf), 0,
(struct sockaddr *)&addr, &addrlen);
This protocol follows the SOCK_DGRAM connection-less semantics.
However, connect() and getpeername() are not supported, as they did
not seem useful with Phonet usages (could be added easily).
Phonet Pipe protocol
--------------------
The Phonet Pipe protocol is a simple sequenced packets protocol
with end-to-end congestion control. It uses the passive listening
socket paradigm. The listening socket is bound to an unique free object
ID. Each listening socket can handle up to 255 simultaneous
connections, one per accept()'d socket.
int lfd, cfd;
lfd = socket(PF_PHONET, SOCK_SEQPACKET, PN_PROTO_PIPE);
listen (lfd, INT_MAX);
/* ... */
cfd = accept(lfd, NULL, NULL);
for (;;)
{
char buf[...];
ssize_t len = read(cfd, buf, sizeof(buf));
/* ... */
write(cfd, msg, msglen);
}
Connections are established between two endpoints by a "third party"
application. This means that both endpoints are passive; so connect()
is not possible.
WARNING:
When polling a connected pipe socket for writability, there is an
intrinsic race condition whereby writability might be lost between the
polling and the writing system calls. In this case, the socket will
block until write because possible again, unless non-blocking mode
becomes enabled.
The pipe protocol provides two socket options at the SOL_PNPIPE level:
PNPIPE_ENCAP accepts one integer value (int) of:
PNPIPE_ENCAP_NONE: The socket operates normally (default).
PNPIPE_ENCAP_IP: The socket is used as a backend for a virtual IP
interface. This requires CAP_NET_ADMIN capability. GPRS data
support on Nokia modems can use this. Note that the socket cannot
be reliably poll()'d or read() from while in this mode.
PNPIPE_IFINDEX is a read-only integer value. It contains the
interface index of the network interface created by PNPIPE_ENCAP,
or zero if encapsulation is off.
Authors
-------
Linux Phonet was initially written by Sakari Ailus.
Other contributors include Mikä Liljeberg, Andras Domokos,
Carlos Chinea and Rémi Denis-Courmont.
Copyright (C) 2008 Nokia Corporation.
Linux wireless regulatory documentation
---------------------------------------
This document gives a brief review over how the Linux wireless
regulatory infrastructure works.
More up to date information can be obtained at the project's web page:
http://wireless.kernel.org/en/developers/Regulatory
Keeping regulatory domains in userspace
---------------------------------------
Due to the dynamic nature of regulatory domains we keep them
in userspace and provide a framework for userspace to upload
to the kernel one regulatory domain to be used as the central
core regulatory domain all wireless devices should adhere to.
How to get regulatory domains to the kernel
-------------------------------------------
Userspace gets a regulatory domain in the kernel by having
a userspace agent build it and send it via nl80211. Only
expected regulatory domains will be respected by the kernel.
A currently available userspace agent which can accomplish this
is CRDA - central regulatory domain agent. Its documented here:
http://wireless.kernel.org/en/developers/Regulatory/CRDA
Essentially the kernel will send a udev event when it knows
it needs a new regulatory domain. A udev rule can be put in place
to trigger crda to send the respective regulatory domain for a
specific ISO/IEC 3166 alpha2.
Below is an example udev rule which can be used:
# Example file, should be put in /etc/udev/rules.d/regulatory.rules
KERNEL=="regulatory*", ACTION=="change", SUBSYSTEM=="platform", RUN+="/sbin/crda"
The alpha2 is passed as an environment variable under the variable COUNTRY.
Who asks for regulatory domains?
--------------------------------
* Users
Users can use iw:
http://wireless.kernel.org/en/users/Documentation/iw
An example:
# set regulatory domain to "Costa Rica"
iw reg set CR
This will request the kernel to set the regulatory domain to
the specificied alpha2. The kernel in turn will then ask userspace
to provide a regulatory domain for the alpha2 specified by the user
by sending a uevent.
* Wireless subsystems for Country Information elements
The kernel will send a uevent to inform userspace a new
regulatory domain is required. More on this to be added
as its integration is added.
* Drivers
If drivers determine they need a specific regulatory domain
set they can inform the wireless core using regulatory_hint().
They have two options -- they either provide an alpha2 so that
crda can provide back a regulatory domain for that country or
they can build their own regulatory domain based on internal
custom knowledge so the wireless core can respect it.
*Most* drivers will rely on the first mechanism of providing a
regulatory hint with an alpha2. For these drivers there is an additional
check that can be used to ensure compliance based on custom EEPROM
regulatory data. This additional check can be used by drivers by
registering on its struct wiphy a reg_notifier() callback. This notifier
is called when the core's regulatory domain has been changed. The driver
can use this to review the changes made and also review who made them
(driver, user, country IE) and determine what to allow based on its
internal EEPROM data. Devices drivers wishing to be capable of world
roaming should use this callback. More on world roaming will be
added to this document when its support is enabled.
Device drivers who provide their own built regulatory domain
do not need a callback as the channels registered by them are
the only ones that will be allowed and therefore *additional*
cannels cannot be enabled.
Example code - drivers hinting an alpha2:
------------------------------------------
This example comes from the zd1211rw device driver. You can start
by having a mapping of your device's EEPROM country/regulatory
domain value to to a specific alpha2 as follows:
static struct zd_reg_alpha2_map reg_alpha2_map[] = {
{ ZD_REGDOMAIN_FCC, "US" },
{ ZD_REGDOMAIN_IC, "CA" },
{ ZD_REGDOMAIN_ETSI, "DE" }, /* Generic ETSI, use most restrictive */
{ ZD_REGDOMAIN_JAPAN, "JP" },
{ ZD_REGDOMAIN_JAPAN_ADD, "JP" },
{ ZD_REGDOMAIN_SPAIN, "ES" },
{ ZD_REGDOMAIN_FRANCE, "FR" },
Then you can define a routine to map your read EEPROM value to an alpha2,
as follows:
static int zd_reg2alpha2(u8 regdomain, char *alpha2)
{
unsigned int i;
struct zd_reg_alpha2_map *reg_map;
for (i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE(reg_alpha2_map); i++) {
reg_map = &reg_alpha2_map[i];
if (regdomain == reg_map->reg) {
alpha2[0] = reg_map->alpha2[0];
alpha2[1] = reg_map->alpha2[1];
return 0;
}
}
return 1;
}
Lastly, you can then hint to the core of your discovered alpha2, if a match
was found. You need to do this after you have registered your wiphy. You
are expected to do this during initialization.
r = zd_reg2alpha2(mac->regdomain, alpha2);
if (!r)
regulatory_hint(hw->wiphy, alpha2, NULL);
Example code - drivers providing a built in regulatory domain:
--------------------------------------------------------------
If you have regulatory information you can obtain from your
driver and you *need* to use this we let you build a regulatory domain
structure and pass it to the wireless core. To do this you should
kmalloc() a structure big enough to hold your regulatory domain
structure and you should then fill it with your data. Finally you simply
call regulatory_hint() with the regulatory domain structure in it.
Bellow is a simple example, with a regulatory domain cached using the stack.
Your implementation may vary (read EEPROM cache instead, for example).
Example cache of some regulatory domain
struct ieee80211_regdomain mydriver_jp_regdom = {
.n_reg_rules = 3,
.alpha2 = "JP",
//.alpha2 = "99", /* If I have no alpha2 to map it to */
.reg_rules = {
/* IEEE 802.11b/g, channels 1..14 */
REG_RULE(2412-20, 2484+20, 40, 6, 20, 0),
/* IEEE 802.11a, channels 34..48 */
REG_RULE(5170-20, 5240+20, 40, 6, 20,
NL80211_RRF_PASSIVE_SCAN),
/* IEEE 802.11a, channels 52..64 */
REG_RULE(5260-20, 5320+20, 40, 6, 20,
NL80211_RRF_NO_IBSS |
NL80211_RRF_DFS),
}
};
Then in some part of your code after your wiphy has been registered:
int r;
struct ieee80211_regdomain *rd;
int size_of_regd;
int num_rules = mydriver_jp_regdom.n_reg_rules;
unsigned int i;
size_of_regd = sizeof(struct ieee80211_regdomain) +
(num_rules * sizeof(struct ieee80211_reg_rule));
rd = kzalloc(size_of_regd, GFP_KERNEL);
if (!rd)
return -ENOMEM;
memcpy(rd, &mydriver_jp_regdom, sizeof(struct ieee80211_regdomain));
for (i=0; i < num_rules; i++) {
memcpy(&rd->reg_rules[i], &mydriver_jp_regdom.reg_rules[i],
sizeof(struct ieee80211_reg_rule));
}
r = regulatory_hint(hw->wiphy, NULL, rd);
if (r) {
kfree(rd);
return r;
}
Transparent proxy support
=========================
This feature adds Linux 2.2-like transparent proxy support to current kernels.
To use it, enable NETFILTER_TPROXY, the socket match and the TPROXY target in
your kernel config. You will need policy routing too, so be sure to enable that
as well.
1. Making non-local sockets work
================================
The idea is that you identify packets with destination address matching a local