1. 13 Oct, 2012 1 commit
  2. 30 Jun, 2008 1 commit
  3. 05 Oct, 2006 1 commit
    • David Howells's avatar
      IRQ: Maintain regs pointer globally rather than passing to IRQ handlers · 7d12e780
      David Howells authored
      Maintain a per-CPU global "struct pt_regs *" variable which can be used instead
      of passing regs around manually through all ~1800 interrupt handlers in the
      Linux kernel.
      
      The regs pointer is used in few places, but it potentially costs both stack
      space and code to pass it around.  On the FRV arch, removing the regs parameter
      from all the genirq function results in a 20% speed up of the IRQ exit path
      (ie: from leaving timer_interrupt() to leaving do_IRQ()).
      
      Where appropriate, an arch may override the generic storage facility and do
      something different with the variable.  On FRV, for instance, the address is
      maintained in GR28 at all times inside the kernel as part of general exception
      handling.
      
      Having looked over the code, it appears that the parameter may be handed down
      through up to twenty or so layers of functions.  Consider a USB character
      device attached to a USB hub, attached to a USB controller that posts its
      interrupts through a cascaded auxiliary interrupt controller.  A character
      device driver may want to pass regs to the sysrq handler through the input
      layer which adds another few layers of parameter passing.
      
      I've build this code with allyesconfig for x86_64 and i386.  I've runtested the
      main part of the code on FRV and i386, though I can't test most of the drivers.
      I've also done partial conversion for powerpc and MIPS - these at least compile
      with minimal configurations.
      
      This will affect all archs.  Mostly the changes should be relatively easy.
      Take do_IRQ(), store the regs pointer at the beginning, saving the old one:
      
      	struct pt_regs *old_regs = set_irq_regs(regs);
      
      And put the old one back at the end:
      
      	set_irq_regs(old_regs);
      
      Don't pass regs through to generic_handle_irq() or __do_IRQ().
      
      In timer_interrupt(), this sort of change will be necessary:
      
      	-	update_process_times(user_mode(regs));
      	-	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING, regs);
      	+	update_process_times(user_mode(get_irq_regs()));
      	+	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING);
      
      I'd like to move update_process_times()'s use of get_irq_regs() into itself,
      except that i386, alone of the archs, uses something other than user_mode().
      
      Some notes on the interrupt handling in the drivers:
      
       (*) input_dev() is now gone entirely.  The regs pointer is no longer stored in
           the input_dev struct.
      
       (*) finish_unlinks() in drivers/usb/host/ohci-q.c needs checking.  It does
           something different depending on whether it's been supplied with a regs
           pointer or not.
      
       (*) Various IRQ handler function pointers have been moved to type
           irq_handler_t.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      (cherry picked from 1b16e7ac850969f38b375e511e3fa2f474a33867 commit)
      7d12e780
  4. 27 Mar, 2006 1 commit
    • Alan Stern's avatar
      [PATCH] Notifier chain update: API changes · e041c683
      Alan Stern authored
      The kernel's implementation of notifier chains is unsafe.  There is no
      protection against entries being added to or removed from a chain while the
      chain is in use.  The issues were discussed in this thread:
      
          http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=linux-kernel&m=113018709002036&w=2
      
      We noticed that notifier chains in the kernel fall into two basic usage
      classes:
      
      	"Blocking" chains are always called from a process context
      	and the callout routines are allowed to sleep;
      
      	"Atomic" chains can be called from an atomic context and
      	the callout routines are not allowed to sleep.
      
      We decided to codify this distinction and make it part of the API.  Therefore
      this set of patches introduces three new, parallel APIs: one for blocking
      notifiers, one for atomic notifiers, and one for "raw" notifiers (which is
      really just the old API under a new name).  New kinds of data structures are
      used for the heads of the chains, and new routines are defined for
      registration, unregistration, and calling a chain.  The three APIs are
      explained in include/linux/notifier.h and their implementation is in
      kernel/sys.c.
      
      With atomic and blocking chains, the implementation guarantees that the chain
      links will not be corrupted and that chain callers will not get messed up by
      entries being added or removed.  For raw chains the implementation provides no
      guarantees at all; users of this API must provide their own protections.  (The
      idea was that situations may come up where the assumptions of the atomic and
      blocking APIs are not appropriate, so it should be possible for users to
      handle these things in their own way.)
      
      There are some limitations, which should not be too hard to live with.  For
      atomic/blocking chains, registration and unregistration must always be done in
      a process context since the chain is protected by a mutex/rwsem.  Also, a
      callout routine for a non-raw chain must not try to register or unregister
      entries on its own chain.  (This did happen in a couple of places and the code
      had to be changed to avoid it.)
      
      Since atomic chains may be called from within an NMI handler, they cannot use
      spinlocks for synchronization.  Instead we use RCU.  The overhead falls almost
      entirely in the unregister routine, which is okay since unregistration is much
      less frequent that calling a chain.
      
      Here is the list of chains that we adjusted and their classifications.  None
      of them use the raw API, so for the moment it is only a placeholder.
      
        ATOMIC CHAINS
        -------------
      arch/i386/kernel/traps.c:		i386die_chain
      arch/ia64/kernel/traps.c:		ia64die_chain
      arch/powerpc/kernel/traps.c:		powerpc_die_chain
      arch/sparc64/kernel/traps.c:		sparc64die_chain
      arch/x86_64/kernel/traps.c:		die_chain
      drivers/char/ipmi/ipmi_si_intf.c:	xaction_notifier_list
      kernel/panic.c:				panic_notifier_list
      kernel/profile.c:			task_free_notifier
      net/bluetooth/hci_core.c:		hci_notifier
      net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_conntrack_core.c:	ip_conntrack_chain
      net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_conntrack_core.c:	ip_conntrack_expect_chain
      net/ipv6/addrconf.c:			inet6addr_chain
      net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_core.c:	nf_conntrack_chain
      net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_core.c:	nf_conntrack_expect_chain
      net/netlink/af_netlink.c:		netlink_chain
      
        BLOCKING CHAINS
        ---------------
      arch/powerpc/platforms/pseries/reconfig.c:	pSeries_reconfig_chain
      arch/s390/kernel/process.c:		idle_chain
      arch/x86_64/kernel/process.c		idle_notifier
      drivers/base/memory.c:			memory_chain
      drivers/cpufreq/cpufreq.c		cpufreq_policy_notifier_list
      drivers/cpufreq/cpufreq.c		cpufreq_transition_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/adb.c:		adb_client_list
      drivers/macintosh/via-pmu.c		sleep_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/via-pmu68k.c		sleep_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/windfarm_core.c	wf_client_list
      drivers/usb/core/notify.c		usb_notifier_list
      drivers/video/fbmem.c			fb_notifier_list
      kernel/cpu.c				cpu_chain
      kernel/module.c				module_notify_list
      kernel/profile.c			munmap_notifier
      kernel/profile.c			task_exit_notifier
      kernel/sys.c				reboot_notifier_list
      net/core/dev.c				netdev_chain
      net/decnet/dn_dev.c:			dnaddr_chain
      net/ipv4/devinet.c:			inetaddr_chain
      
      It's possible that some of these classifications are wrong.  If they are,
      please let us know or submit a patch to fix them.  Note that any chain that
      gets called very frequently should be atomic, because the rwsem read-locking
      used for blocking chains is very likely to incur cache misses on SMP systems.
      (However, if the chain's callout routines may sleep then the chain cannot be
      atomic.)
      
      The patch set was written by Alan Stern and Chandra Seetharaman, incorporating
      material written by Keith Owens and suggestions from Paul McKenney and Andrew
      Morton.
      
      [jes@sgi.com: restructure the notifier chain initialization macros]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAlan Stern <stern@rowland.harvard.edu>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarChandra Seetharaman <sekharan@us.ibm.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJes Sorensen <jes@sgi.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      e041c683
  5. 16 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • Linus Torvalds's avatar
      Linux-2.6.12-rc2 · 1da177e4
      Linus Torvalds authored
      Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history,
      even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git
      archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about
      3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early
      git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good
      infrastructure for it.
      
      Let it rip!
      1da177e4