1. 18 Apr, 2006 10 commits
  2. 11 Apr, 2006 2 commits
    • Kyle McMartin's avatar
      [PATCH] No arch-specific strpbrk implementations · 894b5779
      Kyle McMartin authored
      
      
      While cleaning up parisc_ksyms.c earlier, I noticed that strpbrk wasn't
      being exported from lib/string.c.  Investigating further, I noticed a
      changeset that removed its export and added it to _ksyms.c on a few more
      architectures.  The justification was that "other arches do it."
      
      I think this is wrong, since no architecture currently defines
      __HAVE_ARCH_STRPBRK, there's no reason for any of them to be exporting it
      themselves.  Therefore, consolidate the export to lib/string.c.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarKyle McMartin <kyle@parisc-linux.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      894b5779
    • Yasunori Goto's avatar
      [PATCH] Configurable NODES_SHIFT · c80d79d7
      Yasunori Goto authored
      Current implementations define NODES_SHIFT in include/asm-xxx/numnodes.h for
      each arch.  Its definition is sometimes configurable.  Indeed, ia64 defines 5
      NODES_SHIFT values in the current git tree.  But it looks a bit messy.
      
      SGI-SN2(ia64) system requires 1024 nodes, and the number of nodes already has
      been changeable by config.  Suitable node's number may be changed in the
      future even if it is other architecture.  So, I wrote configurable node's
      number.
      
      This patch set defines just default value for each arch which needs multi
      nodes except ia64.  But, it is easy to change to configurable if necessary.
      
      On ia64 the number of nodes can be already configured in generic ia64 and SN2
      config.  But, NODES_SHIFT is defined for DIG64 and HP'S machine too.  So, I
      changed it so that all platforms can be configured via CONFIG_NODES_SHIFT.  It
      would be simpler.
      
      See also: http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=linux-kernel&m=114358010523896&w=2
      
      Signed-off-by: default avatarYasunori Goto <y-goto@jp.fujitsu.com>
      Cc: Hirokazu Takata <takata@linux-m32r.org>
      Cc: "Luck, Tony" <tony.luck@intel.com>
      Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@muc.de>
      Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
      Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
      Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
      Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
      Cc: Kyle McMartin <kyle@mcmartin.ca>
      Cc: Russell King <rmk@arm.linux.org.uk>
      Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
      Cc: Jack Steiner <steiner@sgi.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      c80d79d7
  3. 31 Mar, 2006 1 commit
  4. 28 Mar, 2006 3 commits
  5. 27 Mar, 2006 3 commits
    • Yoichi Yuasa's avatar
      [PATCH] mips: fixed collision of rtc function name · d23ee8fe
      Yoichi Yuasa authored
      
      
      Fix the collision of rtc function name.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarYoichi Yuasa <yoichi_yuasa@tripeaks.co.jp>
      Cc: Alessandro Zummo <a.zummo@towertech.it>
      Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      d23ee8fe
    • Alan Stern's avatar
      [PATCH] Notifier chain update: API changes · e041c683
      Alan Stern authored
      The kernel's implementation of notifier chains is unsafe.  There is no
      protection against entries being added to or removed from a chain while the
      chain is in use.  The issues were discussed in this thread:
      
          http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=linux-kernel&m=113018709002036&w=2
      
      
      
      We noticed that notifier chains in the kernel fall into two basic usage
      classes:
      
      	"Blocking" chains are always called from a process context
      	and the callout routines are allowed to sleep;
      
      	"Atomic" chains can be called from an atomic context and
      	the callout routines are not allowed to sleep.
      
      We decided to codify this distinction and make it part of the API.  Therefore
      this set of patches introduces three new, parallel APIs: one for blocking
      notifiers, one for atomic notifiers, and one for "raw" notifiers (which is
      really just the old API under a new name).  New kinds of data structures are
      used for the heads of the chains, and new routines are defined for
      registration, unregistration, and calling a chain.  The three APIs are
      explained in include/linux/notifier.h and their implementation is in
      kernel/sys.c.
      
      With atomic and blocking chains, the implementation guarantees that the chain
      links will not be corrupted and that chain callers will not get messed up by
      entries being added or removed.  For raw chains the implementation provides no
      guarantees at all; users of this API must provide their own protections.  (The
      idea was that situations may come up where the assumptions of the atomic and
      blocking APIs are not appropriate, so it should be possible for users to
      handle these things in their own way.)
      
      There are some limitations, which should not be too hard to live with.  For
      atomic/blocking chains, registration and unregistration must always be done in
      a process context since the chain is protected by a mutex/rwsem.  Also, a
      callout routine for a non-raw chain must not try to register or unregister
      entries on its own chain.  (This did happen in a couple of places and the code
      had to be changed to avoid it.)
      
      Since atomic chains may be called from within an NMI handler, they cannot use
      spinlocks for synchronization.  Instead we use RCU.  The overhead falls almost
      entirely in the unregister routine, which is okay since unregistration is much
      less frequent that calling a chain.
      
      Here is the list of chains that we adjusted and their classifications.  None
      of them use the raw API, so for the moment it is only a placeholder.
      
        ATOMIC CHAINS
        -------------
      arch/i386/kernel/traps.c:		i386die_chain
      arch/ia64/kernel/traps.c:		ia64die_chain
      arch/powerpc/kernel/traps.c:		powerpc_die_chain
      arch/sparc64/kernel/traps.c:		sparc64die_chain
      arch/x86_64/kernel/traps.c:		die_chain
      drivers/char/ipmi/ipmi_si_intf.c:	xaction_notifier_list
      kernel/panic.c:				panic_notifier_list
      kernel/profile.c:			task_free_notifier
      net/bluetooth/hci_core.c:		hci_notifier
      net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_conntrack_core.c:	ip_conntrack_chain
      net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_conntrack_core.c:	ip_conntrack_expect_chain
      net/ipv6/addrconf.c:			inet6addr_chain
      net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_core.c:	nf_conntrack_chain
      net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_core.c:	nf_conntrack_expect_chain
      net/netlink/af_netlink.c:		netlink_chain
      
        BLOCKING CHAINS
        ---------------
      arch/powerpc/platforms/pseries/reconfig.c:	pSeries_reconfig_chain
      arch/s390/kernel/process.c:		idle_chain
      arch/x86_64/kernel/process.c		idle_notifier
      drivers/base/memory.c:			memory_chain
      drivers/cpufreq/cpufreq.c		cpufreq_policy_notifier_list
      drivers/cpufreq/cpufreq.c		cpufreq_transition_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/adb.c:		adb_client_list
      drivers/macintosh/via-pmu.c		sleep_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/via-pmu68k.c		sleep_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/windfarm_core.c	wf_client_list
      drivers/usb/core/notify.c		usb_notifier_list
      drivers/video/fbmem.c			fb_notifier_list
      kernel/cpu.c				cpu_chain
      kernel/module.c				module_notify_list
      kernel/profile.c			munmap_notifier
      kernel/profile.c			task_exit_notifier
      kernel/sys.c				reboot_notifier_list
      net/core/dev.c				netdev_chain
      net/decnet/dn_dev.c:			dnaddr_chain
      net/ipv4/devinet.c:			inetaddr_chain
      
      It's possible that some of these classifications are wrong.  If they are,
      please let us know or submit a patch to fix them.  Note that any chain that
      gets called very frequently should be atomic, because the rwsem read-locking
      used for blocking chains is very likely to incur cache misses on SMP systems.
      (However, if the chain's callout routines may sleep then the chain cannot be
      atomic.)
      
      The patch set was written by Alan Stern and Chandra Seetharaman, incorporating
      material written by Keith Owens and suggestions from Paul McKenney and Andrew
      Morton.
      
      [jes@sgi.com: restructure the notifier chain initialization macros]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAlan Stern <stern@rowland.harvard.edu>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarChandra Seetharaman <sekharan@us.ibm.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJes Sorensen <jes@sgi.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      e041c683
    • Dave Hansen's avatar
      [PATCH] unify PFN_* macros · 22a9835c
      Dave Hansen authored
      
      
      Just about every architecture defines some macros to do operations on pfns.
       They're all virtually identical.  This patch consolidates all of them.
      
      One minor glitch is that at least i386 uses them in a very skeletal header
      file.  To keep away from #include dependency hell, I stuck the new
      definitions in a new, isolated header.
      
      Of all of the implementations, sh64 is the only one that varied by a bit.
      It used some masks to ensure that any sign-extension got ripped away before
      the arithmetic is done.  This has been posted to that sh64 maintainers and
      the development list.
      
      Compiles on x86, x86_64, ia64 and ppc64.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDave Hansen <haveblue@us.ibm.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      22a9835c
  6. 26 Mar, 2006 5 commits
  7. 25 Mar, 2006 1 commit
    • Thomas Gleixner's avatar
      [PATCH] sys_alarm() unsigned signed conversion fixup · c08b8a49
      Thomas Gleixner authored
      
      
      alarm() calls the kernel with an unsigend int timeout in seconds.  The
      value is stored in the tv_sec field of a struct timeval to setup the
      itimer.  The tv_sec field of struct timeval is of type long, which causes
      the tv_sec value to be negative on 32 bit machines if seconds > INT_MAX.
      
      Before the hrtimer merge (pre 2.6.16) such a negative value was converted
      to the maximum jiffies timeout by the timeval_to_jiffies conversion.  It's
      not clear whether this was intended or just happened to be done by the
      timeval_to_jiffies code.
      
      hrtimers expect a timeval in canonical form and treat a negative timeout as
      already expired.  This breaks the legitimate usage of alarm() with a
      timeout value > INT_MAX seconds.
      
      For 32 bit machines it is therefor necessary to limit the internal seconds
      value to avoid API breakage.  Instead of doing this in all implementations
      of sys_alarm the duplicated sys_alarm code is moved into a common function
      in itimer.c
      Signed-off-by: default avatarThomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      c08b8a49
  8. 24 Mar, 2006 1 commit
  9. 23 Mar, 2006 1 commit
    • Andrew Morton's avatar
      [PATCH] more for_each_cpu() conversions · 394e3902
      Andrew Morton authored
      
      
      When we stop allocating percpu memory for not-possible CPUs we must not touch
      the percpu data for not-possible CPUs at all.  The correct way of doing this
      is to test cpu_possible() or to use for_each_cpu().
      
      This patch is a kernel-wide sweep of all instances of NR_CPUS.  I found very
      few instances of this bug, if any.  But the patch converts lots of open-coded
      test to use the preferred helper macros.
      
      Cc: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com>
      Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Acked-by: default avatarKyle McMartin <kyle@parisc-linux.org>
      Cc: Anton Blanchard <anton@samba.org>
      Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
      Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
      Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
      Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
      Cc: Paul Mundt <lethal@linux-sh.org>
      Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
      Cc: William Lee Irwin III <wli@holomorphy.com>
      Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@muc.de>
      Cc: Christian Zankel <chris@zankel.net>
      Cc: Philippe Elie <phil.el@wanadoo.fr>
      Cc: Nathan Scott <nathans@sgi.com>
      Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@suse.de>
      Cc: Eric Dumazet <dada1@cosmosbay.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      394e3902
  10. 22 Mar, 2006 2 commits
  11. 21 Mar, 2006 11 commits