1. 24 Jun, 2005 7 commits
    • Christoph Hellwig's avatar
      [PATCH] pass iocb to dio_iodone_t · 92198f7e
      Christoph Hellwig authored
      XFS will have to look at iocb->private to fix aio+dio.  No other filesystem
      is using the blockdev_direct_IO* end_io callback.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarChristoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      92198f7e
    • Michael Halcrow's avatar
      [PATCH] eCryptfs: export user key type · 16c29b67
      Michael Halcrow authored
      Export this symbol to GPL modules for eCryptfs: an out-of-tree GPL'ed
      filesystem.
      
      Signed off by: Michael Halcrow <mhalcrow@us.ibm.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      16c29b67
    • David Howells's avatar
      [PATCH] Keys: Make request-key create an authorisation key · 3e30148c
      David Howells authored
      The attached patch makes the following changes:
      
       (1) There's a new special key type called ".request_key_auth".
      
           This is an authorisation key for when one process requests a key and
           another process is started to construct it. This type of key cannot be
           created by the user; nor can it be requested by kernel services.
      
           Authorisation keys hold two references:
      
           (a) Each refers to a key being constructed. When the key being
           	 constructed is instantiated the authorisation key is revoked,
           	 rendering it of no further use.
      
           (b) The "authorising process". This is either:
      
           	 (i) the process that called request_key(), or:
      
           	 (ii) if the process that called request_key() itself had an
           	      authorisation key in its session keyring, then the authorising
           	      process referred to by that authorisation key will also be
           	      referred to by the new authorisation key.
      
      	 This means that the process that initiated a chain of key requests
      	 will authorise the lot of them, and will, by default, wind up with
      	 the keys obtained from them in its keyrings.
      
       (2) request_key() creates an authorisation key which is then passed to
           /sbin/request-key in as part of a new session keyring.
      
       (3) When request_key() is searching for a key to hand back to the caller, if
           it comes across an authorisation key in the session keyring of the
           calling process, it will also search the keyrings of the process
           specified therein and it will use the specified process's credentials
           (fsuid, fsgid, groups) to do that rather than the calling process's
           credentials.
      
           This allows a process started by /sbin/request-key to find keys belonging
           to the authorising process.
      
       (4) A key can be read, even if the process executing KEYCTL_READ doesn't have
           direct read or search permission if that key is contained within the
           keyrings of a process specified by an authorisation key found within the
           calling process's session keyring, and is searchable using the
           credentials of the authorising process.
      
           This allows a process started by /sbin/request-key to read keys belonging
           to the authorising process.
      
       (5) The magic KEY_SPEC_*_KEYRING key IDs when passed to KEYCTL_INSTANTIATE or
           KEYCTL_NEGATE will specify a keyring of the authorising process, rather
           than the process doing the instantiation.
      
       (6) One of the process keyrings can be nominated as the default to which
           request_key() should attach new keys if not otherwise specified. This is
           done with KEYCTL_SET_REQKEY_KEYRING and one of the KEY_REQKEY_DEFL_*
           constants. The current setting can also be read using this call.
      
       (7) request_key() is partially interruptible. If it is waiting for another
           process to finish constructing a key, it can be interrupted. This permits
           a request-key cycle to be broken without recourse to rebooting.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarBenoit Boissinot <benoit.boissinot@ens-lyon.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      3e30148c
    • David Howells's avatar
      [PATCH] Keys: Use RCU to manage session keyring pointer · 8589b4e0
      David Howells authored
      The attached patch uses RCU to manage the session keyring pointer in struct
      signal_struct.  This means that searching need not disable interrupts and get
      a the sighand spinlock to access this pointer.  Furthermore, by judicious use
      of rcu_read_(un)lock(), this patch also avoids the need to take and put
      refcounts on the session keyring itself, thus saving on even more atomic ops.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      8589b4e0
    • David Howells's avatar
      [PATCH] Keys: Pass session keyring to call_usermodehelper() · 7888e7ff
      David Howells authored
      The attached patch makes it possible to pass a session keyring through to the
      process spawned by call_usermodehelper().  This allows patch 3/3 to pass an
      authorisation key through to /sbin/request-key, thus permitting better access
      controls when doing just-in-time key creation.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      7888e7ff
    • David Howells's avatar
      [PATCH] keys: Discard key spinlock and use RCU for key payload · 76d8aeab
      David Howells authored
      The attached patch changes the key implementation in a number of ways:
      
       (1) It removes the spinlock from the key structure.
      
       (2) The key flags are now accessed using atomic bitops instead of
           write-locking the key spinlock and using C bitwise operators.
      
           The three instantiation flags are dealt with with the construction
           semaphore held during the request_key/instantiate/negate sequence, thus
           rendering the spinlock superfluous.
      
           The key flags are also now bit numbers not bit masks.
      
       (3) The key payload is now accessed using RCU. This permits the recursive
           keyring search algorithm to be simplified greatly since no locks need be
           taken other than the usual RCU preemption disablement. Searching now does
           not require any locks or semaphores to be held; merely that the starting
           keyring be pinned.
      
       (4) The keyring payload now includes an RCU head so that it can be disposed
           of by call_rcu(). This requires that the payload be copied on unlink to
           prevent introducing races in copy-down vs search-up.
      
       (5) The user key payload is now a structure with the data following it. It
           includes an RCU head like the keyring payload and for the same reason. It
           also contains a data length because the data length in the key may be
           changed on another CPU whilst an RCU protected read is in progress on the
           payload. This would then see the supposed RCU payload and the on-key data
           length getting out of sync.
      
           I'm tempted to drop the key's datalen entirely, except that it's used in
           conjunction with quota management and so is a little tricky to get rid
           of.
      
       (6) Update the keys documentation.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      76d8aeab
    • Andrea Arcangeli's avatar
      [PATCH] ppc64: fix seccomp with 32-bit userland · 7286aa9b
      Andrea Arcangeli authored
      The seccomp check has to happen when entering the syscall and not when
      exiting it or regs->gpr[0] contains garabge during signal handling in
      ppc64_rt_sigreturn (this actually might be a bug too, but an orthogonal
      one, since we really have to run the check before invoking the syscall and
      not after it).
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrea Arcangeli <andrea@cpushare.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      7286aa9b
  2. 23 Jun, 2005 33 commits