1. 05 Oct, 2006 1 commit
    • David Howells's avatar
      IRQ: Maintain regs pointer globally rather than passing to IRQ handlers · 7d12e780
      David Howells authored
      
      
      Maintain a per-CPU global "struct pt_regs *" variable which can be used instead
      of passing regs around manually through all ~1800 interrupt handlers in the
      Linux kernel.
      
      The regs pointer is used in few places, but it potentially costs both stack
      space and code to pass it around.  On the FRV arch, removing the regs parameter
      from all the genirq function results in a 20% speed up of the IRQ exit path
      (ie: from leaving timer_interrupt() to leaving do_IRQ()).
      
      Where appropriate, an arch may override the generic storage facility and do
      something different with the variable.  On FRV, for instance, the address is
      maintained in GR28 at all times inside the kernel as part of general exception
      handling.
      
      Having looked over the code, it appears that the parameter may be handed down
      through up to twenty or so layers of functions.  Consider a USB character
      device attached to a USB hub, attached to a USB controller that posts its
      interrupts through a cascaded auxiliary interrupt controller.  A character
      device driver may want to pass regs to the sysrq handler through the input
      layer which adds another few layers of parameter passing.
      
      I've build this code with allyesconfig for x86_64 and i386.  I've runtested the
      main part of the code on FRV and i386, though I can't test most of the drivers.
      I've also done partial conversion for powerpc and MIPS - these at least compile
      with minimal configurations.
      
      This will affect all archs.  Mostly the changes should be relatively easy.
      Take do_IRQ(), store the regs pointer at the beginning, saving the old one:
      
      	struct pt_regs *old_regs = set_irq_regs(regs);
      
      And put the old one back at the end:
      
      	set_irq_regs(old_regs);
      
      Don't pass regs through to generic_handle_irq() or __do_IRQ().
      
      In timer_interrupt(), this sort of change will be necessary:
      
      	-	update_process_times(user_mode(regs));
      	-	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING, regs);
      	+	update_process_times(user_mode(get_irq_regs()));
      	+	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING);
      
      I'd like to move update_process_times()'s use of get_irq_regs() into itself,
      except that i386, alone of the archs, uses something other than user_mode().
      
      Some notes on the interrupt handling in the drivers:
      
       (*) input_dev() is now gone entirely.  The regs pointer is no longer stored in
           the input_dev struct.
      
       (*) finish_unlinks() in drivers/usb/host/ohci-q.c needs checking.  It does
           something different depending on whether it's been supplied with a regs
           pointer or not.
      
       (*) Various IRQ handler function pointers have been moved to type
           irq_handler_t.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      (cherry picked from 1b16e7ac850969f38b375e511e3fa2f474a33867 commit)
      7d12e780
  2. 04 Oct, 2006 6 commits
  3. 01 Oct, 2006 1 commit
  4. 30 Sep, 2006 2 commits
    • David Howells's avatar
      [PATCH] BLOCK: Make it possible to disable the block layer [try #6] · 9361401e
      David Howells authored
      
      
      Make it possible to disable the block layer.  Not all embedded devices require
      it, some can make do with just JFFS2, NFS, ramfs, etc - none of which require
      the block layer to be present.
      
      This patch does the following:
      
       (*) Introduces CONFIG_BLOCK to disable the block layer, buffering and blockdev
           support.
      
       (*) Adds dependencies on CONFIG_BLOCK to any configuration item that controls
           an item that uses the block layer.  This includes:
      
           (*) Block I/O tracing.
      
           (*) Disk partition code.
      
           (*) All filesystems that are block based, eg: Ext3, ReiserFS, ISOFS.
      
           (*) The SCSI layer.  As far as I can tell, even SCSI chardevs use the
           	 block layer to do scheduling.  Some drivers that use SCSI facilities -
           	 such as USB storage - end up disabled indirectly from this.
      
           (*) Various block-based device drivers, such as IDE and the old CDROM
           	 drivers.
      
           (*) MTD blockdev handling and FTL.
      
           (*) JFFS - which uses set_bdev_super(), something it could avoid doing by
           	 taking a leaf out of JFFS2's book.
      
       (*) Makes most of the contents of linux/blkdev.h, linux/buffer_head.h and
           linux/elevator.h contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK being set.  sector_div() is,
           however, still used in places, and so is still available.
      
       (*) Also made contingent are the contents of linux/mpage.h, linux/genhd.h and
           parts of linux/fs.h.
      
       (*) Makes a number of files in fs/ contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK.
      
       (*) Makes mm/bounce.c (bounce buffering) contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK.
      
       (*) set_page_dirty() doesn't call __set_page_dirty_buffers() if CONFIG_BLOCK
           is not enabled.
      
       (*) fs/no-block.c is created to hold out-of-line stubs and things that are
           required when CONFIG_BLOCK is not set:
      
           (*) Default blockdev file operations (to give error ENODEV on opening).
      
       (*) Makes some /proc changes:
      
           (*) /proc/devices does not list any blockdevs.
      
           (*) /proc/diskstats and /proc/partitions are contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK.
      
       (*) Makes some compat ioctl handling contingent on CONFIG_BLOCK.
      
       (*) If CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined, makes sys_quotactl() return -ENODEV if
           given command other than Q_SYNC or if a special device is specified.
      
       (*) In init/do_mounts.c, no reference is made to the blockdev routines if
           CONFIG_BLOCK is not defined.  This does not prohibit NFS roots or JFFS2.
      
       (*) The bdflush, ioprio_set and ioprio_get syscalls can now be absent (return
           error ENOSYS by way of cond_syscall if so).
      
       (*) The seclvl_bd_claim() and seclvl_bd_release() security calls do nothing if
           CONFIG_BLOCK is not set, since they can't then happen.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
      9361401e
    • Jens Axboe's avatar
      [PATCH] Split struct request ->flags into two parts · 4aff5e23
      Jens Axboe authored
      
      
      Right now ->flags is a bit of a mess: some are request types, and
      others are just modifiers. Clean this up by splitting it into
      ->cmd_type and ->cmd_flags. This allows introduction of generic
      Linux block message types, useful for sending generic Linux commands
      to block devices.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJens Axboe <axboe@suse.de>
      4aff5e23
  5. 28 Sep, 2006 1 commit
  6. 26 Sep, 2006 1 commit
  7. 24 Sep, 2006 2 commits
  8. 16 Sep, 2006 3 commits
  9. 07 Sep, 2006 4 commits
  10. 07 Aug, 2006 1 commit
  11. 06 Aug, 2006 2 commits
  12. 13 Jul, 2006 2 commits
  13. 03 Jul, 2006 1 commit
  14. 02 Jul, 2006 13 commits