Commit 59458f40 authored by Steven Whitehouse's avatar Steven Whitehouse
Browse files

Merge branch 'master' into gfs2

parents 825f9075 d834c165
......@@ -1620,7 +1620,8 @@ D: fbdev hacking
N: Jesper Juhl
E: jesper.juhl@gmail.com
D: Various fixes, cleanups and minor features.
D: Various fixes, cleanups and minor features all over the tree.
D: Wrote initial version of the hdaps driver (since passed on to others).
S: Lemnosvej 1, 3.tv
S: 2300 Copenhagen S.
S: Denmark
......@@ -2477,7 +2478,8 @@ S: Derbyshire DE4 3RL
S: United Kingdom
N: Ian S. Nelson
E: ian.nelson@echostar.com
E: nelsonis@earthlink.net
P: 1024D/00D3D983 3EFD 7B86 B888 D7E2 29B6 9E97 576F 1B97 00D3 D983
D: Minor mmap and ide hacks
S: 1370 Atlantis Ave.
S: Lafayette CO, 80026
......
......@@ -532,6 +532,40 @@ appears outweighs the potential value of the hint that tells gcc to do
something it would have done anyway.
Chapter 16: Function return values and names
Functions can return values of many different kinds, and one of the
most common is a value indicating whether the function succeeded or
failed. Such a value can be represented as an error-code integer
(-Exxx = failure, 0 = success) or a "succeeded" boolean (0 = failure,
non-zero = success).
Mixing up these two sorts of representations is a fertile source of
difficult-to-find bugs. If the C language included a strong distinction
between integers and booleans then the compiler would find these mistakes
for us... but it doesn't. To help prevent such bugs, always follow this
convention:
If the name of a function is an action or an imperative command,
the function should return an error-code integer. If the name
is a predicate, the function should return a "succeeded" boolean.
For example, "add work" is a command, and the add_work() function returns 0
for success or -EBUSY for failure. In the same way, "PCI device present" is
a predicate, and the pci_dev_present() function returns 1 if it succeeds in
finding a matching device or 0 if it doesn't.
All EXPORTed functions must respect this convention, and so should all
public functions. Private (static) functions need not, but it is
recommended that they do.
Functions whose return value is the actual result of a computation, rather
than an indication of whether the computation succeeded, are not subject to
this rule. Generally they indicate failure by returning some out-of-range
result. Typical examples would be functions that return pointers; they use
NULL or the ERR_PTR mechanism to report failure.
Appendix I: References
......
......@@ -181,27 +181,6 @@ X!Ilib/string.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="proc">
<title>The proc filesystem</title>
<sect1><title>sysctl interface</title>
!Ekernel/sysctl.c
</sect1>
<sect1><title>proc filesystem interface</title>
!Ifs/proc/base.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="debugfs">
<title>The debugfs filesystem</title>
<sect1><title>debugfs interface</title>
!Efs/debugfs/inode.c
!Efs/debugfs/file.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="vfs">
<title>The Linux VFS</title>
<sect1><title>The Filesystem types</title>
......@@ -234,6 +213,50 @@ X!Ilib/string.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="proc">
<title>The proc filesystem</title>
<sect1><title>sysctl interface</title>
!Ekernel/sysctl.c
</sect1>
<sect1><title>proc filesystem interface</title>
!Ifs/proc/base.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="sysfs">
<title>The Filesystem for Exporting Kernel Objects</title>
!Efs/sysfs/file.c
!Efs/sysfs/symlink.c
!Efs/sysfs/bin.c
</chapter>
<chapter id="debugfs">
<title>The debugfs filesystem</title>
<sect1><title>debugfs interface</title>
!Efs/debugfs/inode.c
!Efs/debugfs/file.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="relayfs">
<title>relay interface support</title>
<para>
Relay interface support
is designed to provide an efficient mechanism for tools and
facilities to relay large amounts of data from kernel space to
user space.
</para>
<sect1><title>relay interface</title>
!Ekernel/relay.c
!Ikernel/relay.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="netcore">
<title>Linux Networking</title>
<sect1><title>Networking Base Types</title>
......@@ -349,13 +372,6 @@ X!Earch/i386/kernel/mca.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="sysfs">
<title>The Filesystem for Exporting Kernel Objects</title>
!Efs/sysfs/file.c
!Efs/sysfs/symlink.c
!Efs/sysfs/bin.c
</chapter>
<chapter id="security">
<title>Security Framework</title>
!Esecurity/security.c
......@@ -386,6 +402,7 @@ X!Iinclude/linux/device.h
-->
!Edrivers/base/driver.c
!Edrivers/base/core.c
!Edrivers/base/class.c
!Edrivers/base/firmware_class.c
!Edrivers/base/transport_class.c
!Edrivers/base/dmapool.c
......@@ -437,6 +454,11 @@ X!Edrivers/pnp/system.c
!Eblock/ll_rw_blk.c
</chapter>
<chapter id="chrdev">
<title>Char devices</title>
!Efs/char_dev.c
</chapter>
<chapter id="miscdev">
<title>Miscellaneous Devices</title>
!Edrivers/char/misc.c
......
......@@ -375,6 +375,26 @@ of information is needed by the kernel developers to help track down the
problem.
Managing bug reports
--------------------
One of the best ways to put into practice your hacking skills is by fixing
bugs reported by other people. Not only you will help to make the kernel
more stable, you'll learn to fix real world problems and you will improve
your skills, and other developers will be aware of your presence. Fixing
bugs is one of the best ways to earn merit amongst the developers, because
not many people like wasting time fixing other people's bugs.
To work in the already reported bug reports, go to http://bugzilla.kernel.org.
If you want to be advised of the future bug reports, you can subscribe to the
bugme-new mailing list (only new bug reports are mailed here) or to the
bugme-janitor mailing list (every change in the bugzilla is mailed here)
http://lists.osdl.org/mailman/listinfo/bugme-new
http://lists.osdl.org/mailman/listinfo/bugme-janitors
Mailing lists
-------------
......
......@@ -326,9 +326,12 @@ for events, they will all receive all events that come in.
For receiving commands, you have to individually register commands you
want to receive. Call ipmi_register_for_cmd() and supply the netfn
and command name for each command you want to receive. Only one user
may be registered for each netfn/cmd, but different users may register
for different commands.
and command name for each command you want to receive. You also
specify a bitmask of the channels you want to receive the command from
(or use IPMI_CHAN_ALL for all channels if you don't care). Only one
user may be registered for each netfn/cmd/channel, but different users
may register for different commands, or the same command if the
channel bitmasks do not overlap.
From userland, equivalent IOCTLs are provided to do these functions.
......
......@@ -61,3 +61,8 @@ kernel patches.
Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt.
18: All new module parameters are documented with MODULE_PARM_DESC()
19: All new userspace interfaces are documented in Documentation/ABI/.
See Documentation/ABI/README for more information.
20: Check that it all passes `make headers_check'.
......@@ -59,11 +59,11 @@ Copyright: The copyright owner must agree to use of GPL.
are the same person/entity. If not, the name of
the person/entity authorizing use of GPL should be
listed in case it's necessary to verify the will of
the copright owner.
the copyright owner.
Interfaces: If your driver uses existing interfaces and behaves like
other drivers in the same class it will be much more likely
to be accepted than if it invents gratuitous new ones.
to be accepted than if it invents gratuitous new ones.
If you need to implement a common API over Linux and NT
drivers do it in userspace.
......@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ Clarity: It helps if anyone can see how to fix the driver. It helps
it will go in the bitbucket.
Control: In general if there is active maintainance of a driver by
the author then patches will be redirected to them unless
the author then patches will be redirected to them unless
they are totally obvious and without need of checking.
If you want to be the contact and update point for the
driver it is a good idea to state this in the comments,
......@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ What Criteria Do Not Determine Acceptance
Vendor: Being the hardware vendor and maintaining the driver is
often a good thing. If there is a stable working driver from
other people already in the tree don't expect 'we are the
vendor' to get your driver chosen. Ideally work with the
vendor' to get your driver chosen. Ideally work with the
existing driver author to build a single perfect driver.
Author: It doesn't matter if a large Linux company wrote the driver,
......@@ -116,17 +116,13 @@ Linux kernel master tree:
ftp.??.kernel.org:/pub/linux/kernel/...
?? == your country code, such as "us", "uk", "fr", etc.
Linux kernel mailing list:
Linux kernel mailing list:
linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
[mail majordomo@vger.kernel.org to subscribe]
Linux Device Drivers, Third Edition (covers 2.6.10):
http://lwn.net/Kernel/LDD3/ (free version)
Kernel traffic:
Weekly summary of kernel list activity (much easier to read)
http://www.kerneltraffic.org/kernel-traffic/
LWN.net:
Weekly summary of kernel development activity - http://lwn.net/
2.6 API changes:
......@@ -145,11 +141,8 @@ KernelNewbies:
Linux USB project:
http://www.linux-usb.org/
How to NOT write kernel driver by arjanv@redhat.com
http://people.redhat.com/arjanv/olspaper.pdf
How to NOT write kernel driver by Arjan van de Ven:
http://www.fenrus.org/how-to-not-write-a-device-driver-paper.pdf
Kernel Janitor:
http://janitor.kernelnewbies.org/
--
Last updated on 17 Nov 2005.
......@@ -173,15 +173,15 @@ For small patches you may want to CC the Trivial Patch Monkey
trivial@kernel.org managed by Adrian Bunk; which collects "trivial"
patches. Trivial patches must qualify for one of the following rules:
Spelling fixes in documentation
Spelling fixes which could break grep(1).
Spelling fixes which could break grep(1)
Warning fixes (cluttering with useless warnings is bad)
Compilation fixes (only if they are actually correct)
Runtime fixes (only if they actually fix things)
Removing use of deprecated functions/macros (eg. check_region).
Removing use of deprecated functions/macros (eg. check_region)
Contact detail and documentation fixes
Non-portable code replaced by portable code (even in arch-specific,
since people copy, as long as it's trivial)
Any fix by the author/maintainer of the file. (ie. patch monkey
Any fix by the author/maintainer of the file (ie. patch monkey
in re-transmission mode)
URL: <http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/bunk/trivial/>
......@@ -209,6 +209,19 @@ Exception: If your mailer is mangling patches then someone may ask
you to re-send them using MIME.
WARNING: Some mailers like Mozilla send your messages with
---- message header ----
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
---- message header ----
The problem is that "format=flowed" makes some of the mailers
on receiving side to replace TABs with spaces and do similar
changes. Thus the patches from you can look corrupted.
To fix this just make your mozilla defaults/pref/mailnews.js file to look like:
pref("mailnews.send_plaintext_flowed", false); // RFC 2646=======
pref("mailnews.display.disable_format_flowed_support", true);
7) E-mail size.
......@@ -245,13 +258,13 @@ updated change.
It is quite common for Linus to "drop" your patch without comment.
That's the nature of the system. If he drops your patch, it could be
due to
* Your patch did not apply cleanly to the latest kernel version
* Your patch did not apply cleanly to the latest kernel version.
* Your patch was not sufficiently discussed on linux-kernel.
* A style issue (see section 2),
* An e-mail formatting issue (re-read this section)
* A technical problem with your change
* He gets tons of e-mail, and yours got lost in the shuffle
* You are being annoying (See Figure 1)
* A style issue (see section 2).
* An e-mail formatting issue (re-read this section).
* A technical problem with your change.
* He gets tons of e-mail, and yours got lost in the shuffle.
* You are being annoying.
When in doubt, solicit comments on linux-kernel mailing list.
......@@ -476,10 +489,10 @@ SECTION 3 - REFERENCES
Andrew Morton, "The perfect patch" (tpp).
<http://www.zip.com.au/~akpm/linux/patches/stuff/tpp.txt>
Jeff Garzik, "Linux kernel patch submission format."
Jeff Garzik, "Linux kernel patch submission format".
<http://linux.yyz.us/patch-format.html>
Greg Kroah-Hartman "How to piss off a kernel subsystem maintainer".
Greg Kroah-Hartman, "How to piss off a kernel subsystem maintainer".
<http://www.kroah.com/log/2005/03/31/>
<http://www.kroah.com/log/2005/07/08/>
<http://www.kroah.com/log/2005/10/19/>
......@@ -488,9 +501,9 @@ Greg Kroah-Hartman "How to piss off a kernel subsystem maintainer".
NO!!!! No more huge patch bombs to linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org people!
<http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=linux-kernel&m=112112749912944&w=2>
Kernel Documentation/CodingStyle
Kernel Documentation/CodingStyle:
<http://sosdg.org/~coywolf/lxr/source/Documentation/CodingStyle>
Linus Torvald's mail on the canonical patch format:
Linus Torvalds's mail on the canonical patch format:
<http://lkml.org/lkml/2005/4/7/183>
--
......@@ -285,7 +285,7 @@ int main(int argc, char *argv[])
if (maskset) {
rc = send_cmd(nl_sd, id, mypid, TASKSTATS_CMD_GET,
TASKSTATS_CMD_ATTR_REGISTER_CPUMASK,
&cpumask, sizeof(cpumask));
&cpumask, strlen(cpumask) + 1);
PRINTF("Sent register cpumask, retval %d\n", rc);
if (rc < 0) {
printf("error sending register cpumask\n");
......@@ -315,7 +315,8 @@ int main(int argc, char *argv[])
}
if (msg.n.nlmsg_type == NLMSG_ERROR ||
!NLMSG_OK((&msg.n), rep_len)) {
printf("fatal reply error, errno %d\n", errno);
struct nlmsgerr *err = NLMSG_DATA(&msg);
printf("fatal reply error, errno %d\n", err->error);
goto done;
}
......@@ -383,7 +384,7 @@ done:
if (maskset) {
rc = send_cmd(nl_sd, id, mypid, TASKSTATS_CMD_GET,
TASKSTATS_CMD_ATTR_DEREGISTER_CPUMASK,
&cpumask, sizeof(cpumask));
&cpumask, strlen(cpumask) + 1);
printf("Sent deregister mask, retval %d\n", rc);
if (rc < 0)
err(rc, "error sending deregister cpumask\n");
......
The struct taskstats
--------------------
This document contains an explanation of the struct taskstats fields.
There are three different groups of fields in the struct taskstats:
1) Common and basic accounting fields
If CONFIG_TASKSTATS is set, the taskstats inteface is enabled and
the common fields and basic accounting fields are collected for
delivery at do_exit() of a task.
2) Delay accounting fields
These fields are placed between
/* Delay accounting fields start */
and
/* Delay accounting fields end */
Their values are collected if CONFIG_TASK_DELAY_ACCT is set.
3) Extended accounting fields
These fields are placed between
/* Extended accounting fields start */
and
/* Extended accounting fields end */
Their values are collected if CONFIG_TASK_XACCT is set.
Future extension should add fields to the end of the taskstats struct, and
should not change the relative position of each field within the struct.
struct taskstats {
1) Common and basic accounting fields:
/* The version number of this struct. This field is always set to
* TAKSTATS_VERSION, which is defined in <linux/taskstats.h>.
* Each time the struct is changed, the value should be incremented.
*/
__u16 version;
/* The exit code of a task. */
__u32 ac_exitcode; /* Exit status */
/* The accounting flags of a task as defined in <linux/acct.h>
* Defined values are AFORK, ASU, ACOMPAT, ACORE, and AXSIG.
*/
__u8 ac_flag; /* Record flags */
/* The value of task_nice() of a task. */
__u8 ac_nice; /* task_nice */
/* The name of the command that started this task. */
char ac_comm[TS_COMM_LEN]; /* Command name */
/* The scheduling discipline as set in task->policy field. */
__u8 ac_sched; /* Scheduling discipline */
__u8 ac_pad[3];
__u32 ac_uid; /* User ID */
__u32 ac_gid; /* Group ID */
__u32 ac_pid; /* Process ID */
__u32 ac_ppid; /* Parent process ID */
/* The time when a task begins, in [secs] since 1970. */
__u32 ac_btime; /* Begin time [sec since 1970] */
/* The elapsed time of a task, in [usec]. */
__u64 ac_etime; /* Elapsed time [usec] */
/* The user CPU time of a task, in [usec]. */
__u64 ac_utime; /* User CPU time [usec] */
/* The system CPU time of a task, in [usec]. */
__u64 ac_stime; /* System CPU time [usec] */
/* The minor page fault count of a task, as set in task->min_flt. */
__u64 ac_minflt; /* Minor Page Fault Count */
/* The major page fault count of a task, as set in task->maj_flt. */
__u64 ac_majflt; /* Major Page Fault Count */
2) Delay accounting fields:
/* Delay accounting fields start
*
* All values, until the comment "Delay accounting fields end" are
* available only if delay accounting is enabled, even though the last
* few fields are not delays
*
* xxx_count is the number of delay values recorded
* xxx_delay_total is the corresponding cumulative delay in nanoseconds
*
* xxx_delay_total wraps around to zero on overflow
* xxx_count incremented regardless of overflow
*/
/* Delay waiting for cpu, while runnable
* count, delay_total NOT updated atomically
*/
__u64 cpu_count;
__u64 cpu_delay_total;
/* Following four fields atomically updated using task->delays->lock */
/* Delay waiting for synchronous block I/O to complete
* does not account for delays in I/O submission
*/
__u64 blkio_count;
__u64 blkio_delay_total;
/* Delay waiting for page fault I/O (swap in only) */
__u64 swapin_count;
__u64 swapin_delay_total;
/* cpu "wall-clock" running time
* On some architectures, value will adjust for cpu time stolen
* from the kernel in involuntary waits due to virtualization.
* Value is cumulative, in nanoseconds, without a corresponding count
* and wraps around to zero silently on overflow
*/
__u64 cpu_run_real_total;
/* cpu "virtual" running time
* Uses time intervals seen by the kernel i.e. no adjustment
* for kernel's involuntary waits due to virtualization.
* Value is cumulative, in nanoseconds, without a corresponding count
* and wraps around to zero silently on overflow
*/
__u64 cpu_run_virtual_total;
/* Delay accounting fields end */
/* version 1 ends here */
3) Extended accounting fields
/* Extended accounting fields start */
/* Accumulated RSS usage in duration of a task, in MBytes-usecs.
* The current rss usage is added to this counter every time
* a tick is charged to a task's system time. So, at the end we
* will have memory usage multiplied by system time. Thus an
* average usage per system time unit can be calculated.
*/
__u64 coremem; /* accumulated RSS usage in MB-usec */
/* Accumulated virtual memory usage in duration of a task.
* Same as acct_rss_mem1 above except that we keep track of VM usage.
*/
__u64 virtmem; /* accumulated VM usage in MB-usec */
/* High watermark of RSS usage in duration of a task, in KBytes. */
__u64 hiwater_rss; /* High-watermark of RSS usage */
/* High watermark of VM usage in duration of a task, in KBytes. */
__u64 hiwater_vm; /* High-water virtual memory usage */
/* The following four fields are I/O statistics of a task. */
__u64 read_char; /* bytes read */
__u64 write_char; /* bytes written */
__u64 read_syscalls; /* read syscalls */
__u64 write_syscalls; /* write syscalls */
/* Extended accounting fields end */
}
......@@ -217,11 +217,11 @@ exclusive cpuset. Also, the use of a Linux virtual file system (vfs)
to represent the cpuset hierarchy provides for a familiar permission
and name space for cpusets, with a minimum of additional kernel code.
The cpus file in the root (top_cpuset) cpuset is read-only.
It automatically tracks the value of cpu_online_map, using a CPU
hotplug notifier. If and when memory nodes can be hotplugged,
we expect to make the mems file in the root cpuset read-only
as well, and have it track the value of node_online_map.
The cpus and mems files in the root (top_cpuset) cpuset are
read-only. The cpus file automatically tracks the value of
cpu_online_map using a CPU hotplug notifier, and the mems file
automatically tracks the value of node_online_map using the
cpuset_track_online_nodes() hook.
1.4 What are exclusive cpusets ?
......
Intel 830M/845G/852GM/855GM/865G/915G Framebuffer driver
Intel 830M/845G/852GM/855GM/865G/915G/945G Framebuffer driver
================================================================
A. Introduction
This is a framebuffer driver for various Intel 810/815 compatible
This is a framebuffer driver for various Intel 8xx/9xx compatible
graphics devices. These would include:
Intel 830M
Intel 810E845G
Intel 845G
Intel 852GM
Intel 855GM
Intel 865G
Intel 915G
Intel 915GM
Intel 945G
Intel 945GM
B. List of available options
......@@ -78,7 +81,7 @@ C. Kernel booting
Separate each option/option-pair by commas (,) and the option from its value
with an equals sign (=) as in the following:
video=i810fb:option1,option2=value2
video=intelfb:option1,option2=value2
Sample Usage
------------
......
......@@ -46,17 +46,8 @@ Who: Jody McIntyre <scjody@modernduck.com>
---------------------------
What: sbp2: module parameter "force_inquiry_hack"
When: July 2006
Why: Superceded by parameter "workarounds". Both parameters are meant to be
used ad-hoc and for single devices only, i.e. not in modprobe.conf,
therefore the impact of this feature replacement should be low.
Who: Stefan Richter <stefanr@s5r6.in-berlin.de>
---------------------------
What: Video4Linux API 1 ioctls and video_decoder.h from Video devices.
When: July 2006
When: December 2006
Why: V4L1 AP1 was replaced by V4L2 API. during migration from 2.4 to 2.6
series. The old API have lots of drawbacks and don't provide enough
means to work with all video and audio standards. The newer API is
......
......@@ -356,10 +356,9 @@ The last two are called only from check_disk_change().
prototypes:
loff_t (*llseek) (struct file *, loff_t, int);
ssize_t (*read) (struct file *, char __user *, size_t, loff_t *);