1. 24 Sep, 2012 1 commit
    • Eric Eide's avatar
      Replace license symbols with {{{ }}}-enclosed license blocks. · 6df609a9
      Eric Eide authored
      This commit is intended to makes the license status of Emulab and
      ProtoGENI source files more clear.  It replaces license symbols like
      "EMULAB-COPYRIGHT" and "GENIPUBLIC-COPYRIGHT" with {{{ }}}-delimited
      blocks that contain actual license statements.
      
      This change was driven by the fact that today, most people acquire and
      track Emulab and ProtoGENI sources via git.
      
      Before the Emulab source code was kept in git, the Flux Research Group
      at the University of Utah would roll distributions by making tar
      files.  As part of that process, the Flux Group would replace the
      license symbols in the source files with actual license statements.
      
      When the Flux Group moved to git, people outside of the group started
      to see the source files with the "unexpanded" symbols.  This meant
      that people acquired source files without actual license statements in
      them.  All the relevant files had Utah *copyright* statements in them,
      but without the expanded *license* statements, the licensing status of
      the source files was unclear.
      
      This commit is intended to clear up that confusion.
      
      Most Utah-copyrighted files in the Emulab source tree are distributed
      under the terms of the Affero GNU General Public License, version 3
      (AGPLv3).
      
      Most Utah-copyrighted files related to ProtoGENI are distributed under
      the terms of the GENI Public License, which is a BSD-like open-source
      license.
      
      Some Utah-copyrighted files in the Emulab source tree are distributed
      under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License, version 2.1
      (LGPL).
      6df609a9
  2. 12 Oct, 2010 1 commit
  3. 21 Aug, 2008 1 commit
  4. 31 Mar, 2008 1 commit
  5. 07 Nov, 2007 1 commit
    • Leigh Stoller's avatar
      Just for kicks and cause I'm such a fan of "the wiki" I went ahead and · b15d5f78
      Leigh Stoller authored
      fully integrated Trac. I put a new installation in /usr/local/www/data/trac
      and I added all the hooks for adding users and doing the cross machine
      login. Only STUDLY() users will actually see the new option in the collab
      dropdown menu.
      
      I have not done anything to make the trac installation look like Emulab.
      b15d5f78
  6. 31 Oct, 2005 1 commit
  7. 14 Oct, 2005 1 commit
    • Leigh Stoller's avatar
      Fixup the mailman support so that instead of using @emulab.net · 75081528
      Leigh Stoller authored
      addresses in the list, use real email addresses. Why? Well, cause I'm
      a dope.  Oh, the real reason is that people cannot post to the lists
      if we use their @emulab.net addresses cause we close the lists (to
      avoid spammers). I did it this way originally cause it was easier;
      there is a lot more bookkeeping to do if using real addresses, and I
      never consider problem of not being able to post.
      75081528
  8. 15 Aug, 2005 1 commit
    • Leigh Stoller's avatar
      The bulk of the mailman support. Still not turned on by default (cause · a64593f3
      Leigh Stoller authored
      Jay has "comments"), but I do not want it hanging around in my source
      tree. Here is my mail message:
      
      * The "My Mailing Lists" is context sensitive (copied from Tim's
        changes to the My Bug Databases). It takes you to the *archives* for
        the current project (or subgroup) list. Or it takes you to your
        first joined project.
      
      * The showproject and showgroup pages have direct links to the project
        and group specific archives. If you are in reddot mode, you also
        get a link to the admin page for the list. Note that project and
        group leaders are just plain members of these lists.
      
      * The interface to create a new "user" list is:
      
      	https://www.emulab.net/dev/stoller/newmmlist.php3
      
        We do not store the password, but just fire it over in the list
        creation process.
      
        Anyone can create their own mailing lists. They are not associated
        with projects, but just the person creating the list. That person
        is the list administrator and is given permission to access the
        configuration page.
      
        This page is not hooked in yet; not sure where.
      
      * Once you have your own lists, you user profile page includes a link
        in the sub menu: Show Mailman Lists. From this page you can delete
        lists, zap to the admin page, or change the admin password (which is
        really just a subpage of the admin page).
      
      * As usual, in reddot mode you can mess with anyone else's mailman lists,
        (via the magic of mailman cookies).
      
      * Note on cross machine login. The mailman stuff has a really easy way
        to generate the right kind of cookie to give users access. You can
        generate a cookie to give user access, or to the admin interface for
        a list (a different cookie). Behind the scenes, I ssh over and get
        the cookie, and set it in the user's browser from boss. When the
        browser is redirected over to ops, that cookie goes along and gives
        the user the requested access. No passwords need be sent around,
        since we do the authentication ourselves.
      a64593f3
  9. 09 Aug, 2005 1 commit
  10. 20 Jul, 2005 1 commit
  11. 28 Mar, 2005 1 commit
    • Leigh Stoller's avatar
      Implement a cross machine login so that user is automatically logged · 9310dedb
      Leigh Stoller authored
      into the Wiki when clicking on the My Wiki's link. Works like this:
      
      * The My Wiki's link points to new page, gotowiki.php3, on boss.
      
      * The gotowiki page looks for a new cookie in the user's browser
        which holds a key (the usual random data run through md5).
      
      * If the key does not exist, generate it and store it in the user
        browser (expires when browser is closed or emulab login times out).
        Also invoke backend script wikixlogin, which will send the key over
        to the wiki server (via ssh), which will write the key into a file
        named by the user account.
      
      * The user's browser is redirected to the wiki server's login script
        (twiki/bin/newlogon), but instead of username and password, we send
        over username and key (as well as redurl= parameter which is the
        page on the wiki server to redirect to later).
      
      * The new login script looks for this case, and opens the file named
        by the user and compares the key it gets with what is in the file.
        If they match, the user login succeeds and the browser is once again
        redirected, but this time to the page it wants on the wiki server.
        If the key does not match, the browser is redirected to the login
        page (so user can enter username password normally). The redurl
        parameter is passed along as well.
      
      * Subsequent clicks on My Wiki's will not need to invoke the backend
        script, since the cookie will be in the browser.
      9310dedb