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    • Kirk Webb's avatar
      Extend the horrible "non-modular" hack in the Cisco snmpit module. · 0981023d
      Kirk Webb authored
      First, a "bug fix": By coincidence the snmpit Cisco module was able to
      build up the mod/port-to-ifindex mapping on newer switches where
      interface descriptions include a submodule ID (e.g.
      "GigabitEthernet1/0/1" vs. "GigabitEthernet1/1"). However, it was
      actually just grabbing the submodule ID in place of the module ID.  This
      is OK (in some loose sense) for non-modular switches where everything is
      effectivley on the same module. Not good for IOS/NX-OS switches with
      actual modules and submodule identifiers. Things would not have worked
      for these.  As a fix that retains backward compatibility, the Cisco
      snmpit module now correctly extracts the module ID, but subtracts '1'
      from it.  This allows existing installations that have zero-based module
      numbering in their database for non-modular IOS/NX-OS switches with
      submodule IDs to continue to work as is.
      
      The above nonsense is not what I set out to do, however, and the commit
      just gets worse. I extended the hack for non-modular switches with a mix
      of gigabit and ten gigabit to bump any ten gigabit interface port's
      module ID to "1". The existing hack already did this for non-modular
      switches with a mix of fast Ethernet and gigabit.  Absolutely horrific.
      I need a shower.
      0981023d