1. 06 Oct, 2003 1 commit
    • Leigh B. Stoller's avatar
      * New libtmcc.pm module that encapsulates the tmcc interface. Most of the · 434a472a
      Leigh B. Stoller authored
        code that was in libsetup has moved into this library, and underwent a
        giant cleaning and pumping up. The interface from your typical perl
        script now looks like this:
      
        use libtmcc;
      
        if (tmcc(TMCCCMD_STATUS, "optional arguments", \@tmccresults) < 0) {
            warn("*** WARNING: Could not get status from server!\n");
            return -1;
        }
        foreach my $me (@tmccresults) {
      	print "bite $me";
        }
      
        The arguments and results are optional values. There is a fourth optional
        value that is a hash of config options (basically converted to command
        line switches passed to tmcc). For example, to set the timeout on an
        individual call, pass a fourth argument like:
      
      	("timeout" => 5)
      
        There is also a way to set global options so that all subsequent tmcc
        calls are affected:
      
      	configtmcc("timeout", 5);
      
        I'll probably clean this up a bit to avoid the direct strings.
      
        The result list is a list of strings. Since we are trending away from
        using tmcc to transfer large amounts of data, I think this is okay.
      
      * A new tmcc.pl which does little more than load libtmcc and use it.
        This will become the new tmcc, with the existing C version becoming a
        backend binary for it.
      
      * All of the perl scripts in tmcd have been changed to use the new
        library. I left the few uses of tmcc in shell scripts alone since they
        were of the simple variety (mostly "state" command).
      
      * And again, if you have read this far, you will learn why I bothered with
        all this. Well, the existing code was really bad and it was getting out
        of control. Sort of like a squid that was getting harder to control as
        its rotting tenticles slithered into more and more scripts. Anyway ...
      
        More important, my goal is to use the libtmcc library to add caching.  I
        have not worked out the details yet, but I am envisioning a configuration
        file, perhaps generated initially by tmcd, of all of the config
        values. If the library finds that file, it sucks the info out of the file
        instead of going to tmcd. Eventually, this config file would be generated
        as part of experiment swapping and stored in the DB, but thats a longer
        term project, and perhaps orthogonal (how we fill the cache is not as
        important as adding the ability to use a cache, right?).
      
        Note that certain operations (like "state" and "ready") are flagged by
        the library to always bypass the "cache".
      434a472a
  2. 30 Sep, 2003 2 commits
  3. 25 Sep, 2003 1 commit
  4. 24 Sep, 2003 1 commit
    • Leigh B. Stoller's avatar
      Convert install-rpm/install-tarfile to use the web server instead of · 0a259517
      Leigh B. Stoller authored
      tmcd (which is bad, since tying up the tmcd threads blocks all nodes
      in the testbed). The old functionality is left in tmcd for now.
      
      On the server side, a new web page (www/spewrpmtar.php3) receives a
      request for a file, along with the nodeid (pcXXX) making the request,
      and the secret key that is generated for each new experiment and
      transfered to the node via tmcd. If the key matches, the operation is
      handed off to tbsetup/spewrpmtar.in which verifies that the file is in
      the list of rpm/tar files for that node, and then spits it out to
      stdout. The web page uses fpassthru() to send the file out to the
      client. The client is using wget, and is required to use https (the
      web page checks).
      
      At present, the external script is run as the creator of the
      experiment, and gid of the experiment. Perhaps this is not a good
      idea. In any event, the file must be in the list of rpm/tarfiles,
      either owned by the experiment creator or with a group of the
      experiment, and the file must reside in either /proj or /groups.
      I use the realpath() function to make sure there are no symlink tricks
      pointing to outside those filesystems. I use the standard NFS read goo to
      prevent transient mount problems that we all know and love.
      0a259517
  5. 23 Sep, 2003 1 commit
    • Kirk Webb's avatar
      Small update to vnodesetup: · 9ddbf74d
      Kirk Webb authored
       - regexp that matched the slice user wasn't working now that we're only
         looking for emulab_<exp_index>.  Witholding this change from libplab.py
         for now until we push out a new tarball with this file
      9ddbf74d
  6. 22 Sep, 2003 1 commit
  7. 17 Sep, 2003 3 commits
  8. 16 Sep, 2003 1 commit
  9. 09 Sep, 2003 1 commit
  10. 04 Sep, 2003 2 commits
  11. 03 Sep, 2003 5 commits
  12. 02 Sep, 2003 2 commits
  13. 29 Aug, 2003 1 commit
    • Mike Hibler's avatar
      (Most of) the rest of the gated-in-jail changes. · 7ad42ea2
      Mike Hibler authored
      Add a -V option to mkjail.pl telling it to use the virtual control net
      IP (172.16.0.1) for the default route instead of the real control net
      IP (155.101.132.1).  In this case, it also assigns a virtual control net
      IP alias (172.17.<pnode>.0) to the physical interface so that the
      aforementioned routes can actually be installed.
      
      Add the same -V option (only valid with -j) in vnodesetup so that we
      can get it through from bootvnodes.  (Also cleaned up the usage message
      some)
      
      The virtual control net address/mask are currently constants in mkjail.pl.
      At some point they can/should be changed to config time options so that we
      can easily use this on minibed too.
      
      In theory, this (-V) shouldn't be an option and we should just use
      virtual control net routing all the time.  But I want to get some more
      testing and we have to resolve the minibed conflicts first.  So for now,
      this is an option and it is off by default.
      
      Haven't tied this option in with gated yet, so creating a vnode experiment
      with Session routing still won't work.  If you want to do that, create the
      experiment, watch gated blow up right and left, login to all the physical
      nodes and change bootvnodes to add -V to the invocation of vnodesetup,
      and then reboot everything.  Now it should be working!
      7ad42ea2
  14. 27 Aug, 2003 5 commits
  15. 22 Aug, 2003 2 commits
  16. 20 Aug, 2003 3 commits
  17. 19 Aug, 2003 2 commits
  18. 18 Aug, 2003 1 commit
  19. 15 Aug, 2003 1 commit
  20. 12 Aug, 2003 1 commit
    • Austin Clements's avatar
      Plab node setup now basically works. There are just a few bugs to · f3beec6e
      Austin Clements authored
      iron out.  TMCD/libsetup now has a plabconfig commands that parallels
      the jailconfig command.  The Plab boot process has been added to
      libsetup and a -p option has been added to vnodesetup to parallel the
      -j option.  Parts of the code that were Jail-specific, but labeled
      just as vnode stuff have been renamed.  $vnodedir in vnodesetup has
      been removed, since it was redunant with libsetup's CONFDIR, and
      CONFDIR is much more intelligent.
      f3beec6e
  21. 07 Aug, 2003 1 commit
  22. 06 Aug, 2003 1 commit
  23. 05 Aug, 2003 1 commit
    • Leigh B. Stoller's avatar
      The rest of the sync server additions: · 212cc781
      Leigh B. Stoller authored
      * Parser: Added new tb command to set the name of the sync server:
      
      	tb-set-sync-server <node>
      
        This initializes the sync_server slot of the experiment entry to the
        *vname* of the node that should run the sync server for that
        experiment. In other words, the sync server is per-experiment, runs
        on a node in the experiment, and the user gets to chose which node
        it runs on.
      
      * tmcd and client side setup. Added new syncserver command which
        returns the name of the syncserver and whether the requesting node
        is the lucky one to run the daemon:
      
          SYNCSERVER SERVER='nodeG.syncserver.testbed.emulab.net' ISSERVER=1
      
        The name of the syncserver is written to /var/emulab/boot/syncserver
        on the nodes so that clients can easily figure out where the server
        is.
      
        Aside: The ready bits are now ignored (no DB accesses are made) for
        virtual nodes; they are forced to use the new sync server.
      
      * New os/syncd directory containing the daemon and the client. The
        daemon is pretty simple. It waits for TCP (and UDP, although that
        path is not complete yet) connections, and reads in a little
        structure that gives the name of the "barrier" to wait for, and an
        optional count of clients in the group (this would be used by the
        "master" who initializes barriers for clients). The socket is saved
        (no reply is made, so the client is blocked) until the count reaches
        zero. Then all clients are released by writting back to the
        sockets, and the sockets are closed. Obviously, the number of
        clients is limited by the numbed of FDs (open sockets), hence the
        need for a UDP variant, but that will take more work.
      
        The client has a simple command line interface:
      
          usage: emulab-sync [options]
          -n <name>         Optional barrier name; must be less than 64 bytes long
          -d                Turn on debugging
          -s server         Specify a sync server to connect to
          -p portnum        Specify a port number to connect to
          -i count          Initialize named barrier to count waiters
          -u                Use UDP instead of TCP
      
          The client figures out the server by looking for the file created
          above by libsetup (/var/emulab/boot/syncserver). If you do not
          specify a barrier "name", it uses an internal default. Yes, the
          server can handle multiple barriers (differently named of course)
          at once (non-overlapping clients obviously).
      
          Clients can wait before a barrier in "initialized." The count on
          the barrier just goes negative until someone initializes the
          barrier using the -i option, which increments the count by the
          count. Therefore, the master does not have to arrange to get there
          "first." As an example, consider a master and one client:
      
      	nodeA> /usr/local/etc/emulab/emulab-sync -n mybarrier
      	nodeB> /usr/local/etc/emulab/emulab-sync -n mybarrier -i 1
      
          Node A waits until Node B initializes the barrier (gives it a
          count).  The count is the number of *waiters*, not including the
          master. The master is also blocked until all of the waiters have
          checked in.
      
          I have not made an provision for timeouts or crashed clients. Lets
          see how it goes.
      212cc781