Commit 559a1cde authored by David Johnson's avatar David Johnson
Browse files

Updated for pc600 wireless nodes, FC4-WIRELESS, and ad-hoc mode.

parent 058aff11
......@@ -78,6 +78,9 @@ Asus P3B-F (6 PCI/1 ISA slot) motherboard (old reliable BX chipset).
href="http://support.intel.com/support/network/adapter/pro100/index.htm">
Intel EtherExpress Pro/100B</a> 10/100Mbps Ethernet cards.
<li>
1 <a href="http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=0&pid=306">
D-Link DWL-AG530</a> 802.11a/b/g wireless NIC with external antenna.
<li>
13GB IBM 34GXP DPTA-371360 7200RPM IDE hard drive.
<li> Floppy drive
<li> Cheap video card (Jaton Riva 128ZX AGP w/4MB video RAM)
......
......@@ -8,12 +8,23 @@
</center>
Some Emulab nodes contain 802.11 a/b/g wifi interfaces (Atheros 5212 chipset),
and are scattered around at various locations. To find out where they
and are scattered around at various locations in a large building. To find out where they
are located and what their node IDs are, see the <a
href=https://www.emulab.net/floormap.php3>wireless floormaps</a> page.
When you click on one of the colored dots, you will be taken to a page
describing the node and what type of interfaces the node has installed
in it.
<br>
<br>
In addition to the nodes deployed throughout the building, we've also
concentrated a subset of them in our machine room. 36 of the pc600s now have
802.11 a/b/g interfaces, also with the Atheros 5212 chipset. Each has an
external antenna deployed on the backs of the racks containing the pc600s. To
find out which nodes are where, look at <a
href="https://www.emulab.net/floormap.php3?building=MEB-MRC600">the floormaps
for this sub-cluster</a>. For connectivity, antenna positions, and related
information, see the <a href="#envinfo">Environmental Information</a>
subsection of this document.
<br>
<br>
......@@ -95,11 +106,11 @@ following small example:
tb-set-lan-setting $lan0 "channel" 2
tb-set-node-lan-setting $lan0 $nodew1 "txpower" "auto"
# Currently you must use Redhat 9.0 on wireless nodes.
# Currently you must use Fedora Core 4 or Redhat 9.0 on wireless nodes.
# Let the other node default to RHL-STD (currently 7.3).
tb-set-node-os $nodew1 RHL90-WIRELESS
tb-set-node-os $nodew2 RHL90-WIRELESS
tb-set-node-os $nodew3 RHL90-WIRELESS
tb-set-node-os $nodew1 FC4-WIRELESS
tb-set-node-os $nodew2 FC4-WIRELESS
tb-set-node-os $nodew3 FC4-WIRELESS
# Turn on static routing.
$ns rtproto Static
......@@ -123,11 +134,10 @@ A few points should be noted:
as long as the nodes have enough wired interfaces. If you try to
create an experiment that uses more links (wired or wireless) on a
node than are available in Emulab, the experiment will fail to map.
Of the current 28 wifi nodes, the 18 pc3000w wifi nodes
(pcwf1-18) contain two wifi cards and one wired experimental interface,
the four pc600 nodes (pc2,9,31,40) contain one wifi card and four
experimental interfaces, and the four pc2Uwifi (pc180,182,183,184)
nodes have one wifi card and no wired experimental interfaces.
Of the current 54 wifi nodes, the 18 pc3000w wifi nodes
(pcwf1-18) contain two wifi cards and one wired experimental interface
and the 36 pc600 (all pc600s except pc8,pc11,pc30,pc38) nodes contain one wifi card and four
experimental interfaces.
<li> In the example above, we let Emulab decide what wireless nodes to
use for the lan. This is not an ideal approach, as Emulab does
......@@ -138,15 +148,15 @@ A few points should be noted:
problem.
<li> You must specify which node is to act as the <em>access point</em> for
the lan. Rather then using dedicated access points, Emulab's
the lan. Rather than using dedicated access points, Emulab's
implementation of wireless lans uses the interface's capability to
become an access point for a lan. The node that is chosen to be the
access point should obviously be within range of all of the nodes in
the lan. There is currently no automated mechanism to pick the access
point for you, but one is planned for the future.
We also plan to support <em>ad-hoc</em> mode;
unfortunately the proprietary layer under the Linux driver for our
Atheros cards does not currently support it.
<em>ad-hoc</em> mode is available in recent madwifi driver versions,
including those installed on the <tt>FC4-WIRELESS</tt> image. However, we
haven't yet integrated it as an option for NS files.
<li> Wireless lans allow a number of configuration parameters to be
specified, either for the lan as a whole, or for individual members of
......@@ -158,12 +168,18 @@ A few points should be noted:
transmit power for <tt>nodew1</tt> to auto; all other nodes will
default to an interface specific setting.
<li> You must use Redhat 9.0 to take advantage of wireless interfaces. Be
sure to set the OSID for all of your wireless nodes to
<tt>RHL90-WIRELESS</tt>.
<li> The wifi nodes contain Netgear WAG311 cards, which use the
Atheros 5212 802.11a/b/g chipset. This chipset is quite flexible
<li> You must use Fedora Core 4 or RedHat 9.0 to take advantage of wireless
interfaces. Be sure to set the OSID for all of your wireless nodes to
<tt>FC4-WIRELESS</tt> or <tt>RHL90-WIRELESS</tt>. <tt>FC4-WIRELESS</tt>
contains a 2.6.x kernel and very recent madwifi drivers;
<tt>RHL90-WIRELESS</tt> is contains a 2.4.x kernel and is outdated.
<li> The pc3000w wifi nodes contain <a
href="http://netgear.com/products/details/WAG311.php">Netgear WAG311
cards</a>, which use the Atheros 5212 802.11a/b/g chipset;
the pc600 nodes contain <a
href="http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=0&pid=306">D-Link DWL-AG530</a>,
which also use the Atheros 5212 chipset. This chipset is quite flexible
since most of the 802.11 MAC layer is handled in software. Emulab
provides the standard madwifi Atheros driver by default, but
there are alternatives such as the madwifi stripped driver from
......@@ -173,6 +189,9 @@ A few points should be noted:
<a href="http://netgear.com/products/details/WAG311.php">
Netgear WAG311 product info</a>
<br>
<a href="http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=0&pid=306">
D-Link DWL-AG530</a>
<br>
<a href="http://madwifi.sourceforge.net">Madwifi Atheros driver</a>
<br>
<a href="http://pdos.csail.mit.edu/~jbicket/madwifi.stripped/">
......@@ -183,7 +202,7 @@ A few points should be noted:
Numerous interface settings are possible using <tt>tb-set-lan-setting</tt>
and <tt>tb-set-node-lan-setting</tt>. These mostly correspond to options
that are available using the <tt>iwconfig</tt> command on Redhat 9.0. Not
that are available using the <tt>iwconfig</tt> command on Fedora Core 4 or Redhat 9.0. Not
all options are accepted by all cards, and the format of the value you
provide for the option must be acceptable to iwconfig. At some point in the
future we hope to make this more explicit so that know exactly what options
......@@ -318,3 +337,120 @@ choose which nodes you want, and then in your NS file:
Keep in mind that the physical nodes you choose must be free when you
swap in your experiment!
<br>
<br>
<a NAME="envinfo"></a>
<font size=+1>
Environment Information</font>
<br>
<br>
Due to the dense nature of the pc600 mini-cluster, we describe some of its
properties and deployment characteristics in detail in this section. You can
view a map of the deployment
<a href="https://www.emulab.net/floormap.php3?building=MEB-MRC600">here</a>.
<br>
<br>
The external antennas for each wireless interface in the pc600s are deployed in
a 6 x 6 grid on the back side of the racks housing the pc600s and pc850s. Each
antenna is currently pointed straight down towards the floor. The
grid is 300cm x 224cm. All nodes in the grid are easily able to communicate
with each another; the interesting nature of this grid becomes more evident
when many nodes attempt to send packets at the same time. Because the nodes
are deployed in our machine room, the environment is hostile, with many other
racks, machines, conduits, and other items, conspiring to provide various types
of signal interference.
<br>
<br>
To give you an idea of what you might expect when many nodes in proximity are
sending packets at the same time, we ran some simple tests. In this
experiment, all nodes are placed in ad-hoc mode in a single LAN, and send
packets all at once to the broadcast address in their subnet. Each node sends
1000 1024-byte packets at a rate of 10pps. We then do this iteratively over
all channels in each of a, b, and g modes. The results are presented in terms
of the percentage of broadcast packets received at each node. The Aggregate
Statistics table simply aggregates all statistics gathered from each 802.11
mode across all receivers.
<br>
<br>
<center>
<table>
<tr>
<td colspan="6"><center>Aggregate Statistics</center></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>Mode</td>
<td>min</td>
<td>mean</td>
<td>max</td>
<td>stddev</td>
<td>var</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>802.11 a</td>
<td>0.10</td>
<td>65.21</td>
<td>99.40</td>
<td>15.69</td>
<td>246.27</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>802.11 b</td>
<td>2.10</td>
<td>25.19</td>
<td>91.10</td>
<td>15.01</td>
<td>225.25</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>802.11 g</td>
<td>0.30</td>
<td>26.04</td>
<td>83.10</td>
<td>15.84</td>
<td>250.99</td>
</tr>
</table>
</center>
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